Samford University

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H

homecoming
Capitalize only when the year immediately follows.
            Join us on the Quad for Homecoming 1996.
            The homecoming bonfire will be on the Quad.

honor societies, honoraries
Never honorary society—use either honor society or honorary.

hyphens
There are two acceptable uses of hyphens:

1. In hyphenation, to break words at the ends of lines of copy. Limit hyphenation as much as possible.

            Don’t break a hyphenated compound in the middle of either of its component words. If the compound must be broken, break it after the hyphen.
            Avoid line breaks that leave only one or two letters at the beginning or end of a line.
            Avoid having more than three lines in a row end in hyphens.
            Avoid breaking personal names, proper nouns, phone or fax numbers, e-mail or web addresses, and elements of street and mailing addresses. If you must break a web or email address, break it after a punctuation mark. See email, web addresses.

2. In hyphenated compounds, such as on-screen. When in doubt, consult a current dictionary.

            Hyphens usually may be omitted after these prefixes: 

            ante-
            anti-
            bi-
            bio-
            co-
            counter-
            extra-
            infra-
            inter-
            intra-
            macro-
            meta-
            micro-
            mid-
            mini-
            multi-
            non-
            over-
            post-
            pre-
            pro-
            pseudo-
            re-
            semi-
            sub-
            super-
            supra-
            trans-
            ultra-
            un-
            under-

            Use hyphens with these prefixes, unless a current dictionary indicates otherwise:
            best-
            better-
            cross-
            full-
            half-
            high-
            ill-
            least-
            lesser-
            little-
            low-
            lower-
            mid-
            middle-
            quasi-
            self-
            upper-

            Use hyphens with temporary compounds, such as those invented by the writer: quasi-realistic, post-homecoming. A compound is permanent when it can be found in a current dictionary or style manual.
            Consult a current dictionary or style manual to determine whether to close or hyphenate common compounds, such as lifelong (closed) or life-sized (hyphenated).
            Use hyphens to prevent misreadings—to link two or more words so they won’t be misread as linked to or modifying other words.
            Unclear: finite element equation
            Better: finite-element equation

            Compounds with -like and -wide are usually closed, except for words of three or more syllables, proper nouns or other forms in which a closed compound likely would be confusing (such as words ending with -l): 

            Poe-like
            swanlike
            university-wide

            Use the en dash ( – ) instead of the hyphen when creating a compound in which (a) one or more of the terms consists of two words or (b) both terms are hyphenated compounds:
            San Francisco–New York flight
            New York–Boston train 
            But use only hyphens in other instances: 

            non-English-speaking students
            outboard-motor-powered craft
            mental-health-care facility

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