News: 2013

Samford's Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership Presents New Awards

Contact: Sean Flynt, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

November 15, 2013 - Samford University’s Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership presented its inaugural Leadership and Character Awards at a Nov. 15 ceremony.

Beginning this year, the awards will be given annually to students nominated by deans and other university executives and selected for their consistent leadership and strong character, including humility, courage, self-control and justice.

The 2013 honorees are: Timothy Lewis (McWhorter School of Pharmacy); Scott McKaig (Brock School of Business); Clayton Hornback (Beeson Divinity School); Bethany Orick (School of the Arts); Cameron Thomas (Howard College of Arts & Sciences); Caitlyn White (Cumberland School of Law); Hannah Barnette (Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education); Cari Gelderman (Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing); Cody Russell (School of Health Professions).

Cameron Thomas earned the additional honor of the Mann Center’s Joe McDade Scholarship, which carries a one-time gift of approximately $3,000. The ideal nominee for the Joe McDade demonstrates a life and character lived in the spirit of Christ; a contribution to the overall betterment and wellbeing of the University; participation in a wide range of campus life; leadership ability; an embodiment of the overall goals, mission, and spirit of the University; and commitment to the long range development and wellbeing of the University.

“I am delighted that we have the opportunity to recognize students who have such great potential as men and women of character, and who are already making the most of that potential,” said Mann Center program manager Azalea Hulbert. “The quality of the inaugural cohort of students chosen for this award is outstanding, and represents the very best of Samford.”

Hulbert also expressed gratitude for the support of Samford alumni Joe McDade (61) and Marvin L. Mann ('54,) who have made possible the awards and the larger work of the Mann Center.

Recent Projects and Programs of the Mann Center: 2012-2013 Year in Review

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

September 11, 2013 - Following are significant highlights of the Mann Center's work during the 2012-2013 academic year. A full review is available in our newly-released progress report, available online.

Academic integrity was a recurring focus of the Mann Center's work during the 2012-2013 academic year, with more than 400 freshmen in attendance at a student-led Courageous Conversation on academic honesty in September. In February, Mann Center program manager Azalea Hulbert presented at the 2013 conference of the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI); the center is now leading a regional consortium on academic integrity, which was launched at an April conference on Samford's campus.

The center sponsored several significant speaker programs during 2012 and 2013, starting with Dr. Mark Douglas' October lecture, Faith and Politics: Do We Need Religion in the Public Square? and Rwandan Bishop Laurent Mbanda's November presentation on the role of church leadership in promoting change. In January, the center co-sponsored the Alabama Social Business Forum at Tuskegee University, which featured Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus. The final lecture of the academic year, Abraham Lincoln and the Challenge of Emancipation, was presented by the 2013 A. Gerow Hodges Lecturer, Dr. Richard Carwardine.

The Mann Center's signature Better World Theatre pedagogy, which debuted in 2011, was incorporated into an introductory nursing course in November 2012 and used successfully for the first time in a co-curricular context during the spring 2013 semester, with students performing for professional audiences during two April conferences. The pedagogy allows students to identify and lead dialogue on ethical issues they will face in their careers, and is consistently given high marks by participating students.

In July 2012, Samford students participated in the second annual South Africa service practicum, facilitated by the Mann Center. The students developed basic business curriculum for Living Way, a Cape Town-based NGO, which runs an Agri-Academy for aspiring farmers. A team returned in July 2013 to complete the project with the Agri-Academy.

South Africa, July 2013: Final Update

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

September 11, 2013 - This July, five Samford students traveled to South Africa to complete a long-term service project conducted with Living Way, a Cape-Town based micro-enterprise center. The purpose of the project is to develop leadership competencies of Samford students through active engagement and service.

The service project started in 2011, when three Samford students worked with Living Way to develop an entrepreneurship screening tool. In 2012, a team returned to begin developing curriculum for students who had been selected to participate in the organization's Agri-Academy, a mentoring program for aspiring farmers. This year's team, which included Samford undergraduates Tracy Knapp (as team leader), Clarissa Donaldson, Natalie Bennie, Rachel Eller, and Brittony Mays, completed the basic business curriculum that was started in 2012.

During the trip, students also had the opportunity to visit many significant historical and cultural sites, and spend time with their peers at Stellenbosch University, located near Cape Town. This fall, the Mann Center will continue the dialogue with students and faculty at Stellenbosch's Frederick Van Zyl Slabbert Leadership Center through long-distance conversations that focus on similarities between the end of apartheid and the civil rights movement.

Photographs from the trip are available on the Mann Center website.

The Frances Marlin Mann Awards for Leadership and Character: Recognizing Outstanding Student Leaders

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

September 11, 2013 - In November, the Mann Center will host the inaugural presentation of the Frances Marlin Mann Awards for Leadership and Character, a recognition program for students who consistently exhibit exemplary leadership and strong character. One student from each school will be selected as an award recipient by his or her respective dean, with one additional recipient chosen by the department of athletics.

Of these students, one will be chosen to receive the Joe McDade Scholarship, a generous gift provided by Mr. Joe McDade, Samford alum and long-time supporter. The ideal student will demonstrate a life and character lived in the spirit of Christ; a contribution and commitment to the long-term development of the University; and leadership ability.

An award ceremony and reception will be held on Friday, November 15th, during Homecoming weekend festivities. All are welcome to attend; more information will be available online as it becomes available.

Addicted to Violence: A Year-Long Series

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

September 11, 2013 - A number of Mann Center programs during the 2013-2014 academic year will focus on the theme, "Addicted to Violence." The center will partner with both on- and off-campus partners to explore various aspects of ethics and violence, including health, public policy, business, the arts, and theology.

Currently planned programs include a series of Courageous Conversations on violence against women, and a Better World Theatre performance focusing on workplace bullying. Other lectures and panel discussions are being planned; an updated schedule of events is available online.

One of the most significant programs of the year will be the presentation of the Mann Medal to an internationally recognized leader whose work addresses the culture of violence. Nominations for the Mann Medal will be accepted on an ongoing basis until a recipient is selected; more information and a nomination form may be found online.

South Africa, July 2013: Update 2

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

July 20, 2013 - It's been a busy week and a half in South Africa! During the first week, the entire team was able to visit several significant sites, including the Robben Island prison where Nelson Mandela was incarcerated for 18 years. We also sat down for a conversation with students at Stellenbosch University, a traditionally Afrikaans-speaking university that has welcomed a diverse population of students since the end of apartheid.

The work with Living Way is progressing extremely well. Our team is working with the Agri-Academy, a mentoring program that is part of Living Way. The Academy currently has 13 students, all of whom are in the first phase of the program. During this phase, they are learning the basics of working in an agricultural business. Those who graduate from this phase will leave well-prepared to engage in the formal economy, while those who continue on will receive further training in management and entrepreneurship. Our role in this project is to prepare curriculum for the more advanced stages of the Agri-Academy.

On Thursday, 18 July, the team spent an entire day serving at Living Hope for Mandela Day. This day of service honors Nelson Mandela, and is commemorated each year on his birthday. On this day, South Africans and global citizens alike are asked to engage in 67 minutes of service, one minute for each year Mandela spent as a freedom fighter. There was substantial work to do at Living Hope that day, including clearing of a new plot of land that will eventually be home to the Living Way Agri-Academy.

Stay tuned for a final update after the conclusion of the trip!

South Africa, July 2013: Update 1

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

July 10, 2013 - Greetings from South Africa! This month, five Samford University students are engaging in economic development work in Cape Town, as part of a multi-year collaborative project facilitated by the Mann Center.

The students are working in the Masiphumelele township with Living Way, a non-governmental organization based in Cape Town. In a continuation of last year’s project, the team is developing curriculum for students in Living Way’s Agri-Academy, a program that teaches the basics of running an agricultural business.

Tracy Knapp, a senior philosophy major, is this year’s team leader. Joining her are Natalie Bennie, a sophomore global studies major; Clarissa Donaldson, a senior Brock Scholar; Rachel Eller, a senior marketing and economics major; and Brittony Mays, a senior political science major.

Stay tuned for more updates from the team!

Video: The Samford Chronicle, 5/8/13 Edition

Contact: Brad Radice, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication



Conference Strives to Engage Students, Teachers to Promote Academic Integrity

Contact: Megan Thompson, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

April 23, 2013 - Samford University's Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership recently hosted the 2013 Southeast Regional Academic Integrity Conference. The event was cosponsored with the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI).

Conference sessions focused on best practices in academic integrity.

Keynote speaker was Gary Pavela, director of academic integrity at Syracuse University. Pavela began with his thoughts on preventing academic dishonesty. According to Pavela, students engaging with teachers is the most effective way to establish academic integrity in the humanities.

"When we create the sense that we have bonded in some way, we have less problem with academic integrity," Pavela says. "We must try to reach people with what they feel, not what they cognate.

"People have to find some way to make sense of the world. That's what part of the humanities is. If we can engage students in their work…we can help them sort out what's happening around them."

Pavela said the passion to question "why things are as they are" is not limited to the humanities, however. "In the hands of good teachers, it carries over to all of the fields."

Samford freshmen students Kristin Aebli, Catherine Forman, Claire Gaxiola and Christina Witt performed a short play on academic integrity, which they wrote, and led the audience in a discussion of the ethical issues in the play.

"Not only was their performance fantastic, they exhibited an enormous amount of poise during the discussion and represented Samford very well," said Azalea Hulbert, Mann Center program manager.

This was the first year for the Southeastern Regional Academic Integrity Conference. Hulbert said the conference was successful in bringing leaders from other schools together on campus to discuss the issue of academic integrity.

"We had just over 40 attendees at the conference, representing 26 institutions in seven states. These attendees included faculty, student affairs staff, administrators, and students, and represented a variety of schools: large public institutions, community colleges, military schools, and smaller private schools."

The Mann Center will continue to use the Academic Integrity Conference to establish these relationships between different academic fields, according to Hulbert. The Mann Center will begin to lead a consortium formed in partnership with the ICAI, one facet of which will be the annual conference, at Samford.

"ICAI hosts an international conference every year, but has recently been working to create smaller regional consortia that can keep the work of ICAI going more effectively throughout the year," Hulbert said. "Our ICAI Southeast Consortium is the third such group to be formed to date. We feel that this collaboration will enrich academic integrity practices at schools throughout the Southeast, and will position Samford as a thought leader in this critical area."

Academic Integrity Topic at Samford April 19-20

Contact: Mary Wimberley, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

April 5, 2013 - Best practices in academic integrity will be the theme when higher education faculty and administrators gather at Samford University April 19-20 for the inaugural Southeast Regional Academic Integrity Conference.

The program is co-sponsored by the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI) and Samford's Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership. Organizers say the conference will provide an opportunity for dialogue among educators who face similar challenges.

"Every college and university strives to promote academic integrity and prevent cheating," said Mann Center director Dr. John C. Knapp. "But two factors have made this task more challenging in recent years: the availability of technology for sharing information, and the astonishing extent to which cheating now occurs at the high school level."

Session topics will include plagiarism, a counseling approach to academic dishonesty, and more.

The Mann Center's Better World Theatre will present Samford freshmen in student-scripted plays on themes of academic integrity. The students will then lead the audience in a discussion of the ethical issues identified in the performance.

ICAI co-founder and former president Gary Pavela will give the keynote dinner address on Friday, April 19. A nationally recognized expert on honor codes and other facets of academic honesty, Dr. Pavela is a former director of academic integrity at Syracuse University. He will also meet with Samford faculty and students to discuss the school's specific culture as it relates to academic integrity.

Presenters also include Iva Bimi Ballard and James Orr, both of Mississippi State University; Kevin Kozee, University of South Carolina; and Michael Goodwin, Kennesaw State University.

During the conference, the Mann Center will formally launch a new Southeastern Regional Academic Integrity Consortium, with an aim to strengthen collaborative ties with other area schools.

The conference format will allow participants to discuss best practices of academic integrity in an informal and collegial environment, according to program manager Azalea M. Hulbert, who says registration is open to both members and non-members of ICAI.

For information and registration, check online at www.samford.edu/manncenter/2013conference.aspx or contact Hulbert at (205) 726-4634.

Hope Selects New President

Contact: Lisa Ermak, The Holland Sentinel

Source: The Holland Sentinel

March 25, 2013 - On Monday, John C. Knapp, founding director of the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala., was chosen to be Hope College’s next president.

Knapp will begin work as the college’s 12th president on July 1, succeeding Jim Bultman who will retire this summer after serving for 14 years.

A search committee comprised of trustees, alumni, faculty, administrators and students has been working since May 2011, along with Atlanta-based CarterBaldwin Executive Search, to find Bultman’s replacement.

Mary Bauman, chairperson of the Board of Trustees, said the college is thankful for the contributions of President Bultman and thinks Knapp will continue to build on the legacy he built.

“Dr. Knapp is the right leader for Hope College at this time in their history,” she said. “Never before has it been more important to equip our students for lives of leadership and service in a global society.”

Bauman said Knapp’s experience helping Christians understand how to bridge their faith to their work will help the college achieve its mission and his reputation with leaders in Christian higher education will enhance Hope’s efforts to become a "destination institution."

During his five years directing the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership, Knapp has worked to integrate a Christian ethical perspective into the education of young people. The center promotes the connection between ethics and good leadership, and works with students as well as the professional community.

Before coming to Samford, Knapp was a professor and director of the Center for Ethics and Corporate Responsibility at Georgia State University at its college of business.

He also was president of a corporate communication firm prior to work in education.

Currently, Knapp speaks throughout the country about the moral purposes of higher education and has authored several books on the topics of leadership and business.

He is a contributor to several well-known publications, including The New York Times, BusinessWeek and Sports Illustrated and serves on several boards, most recently, the board of Clemson University’s Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics and the International Center for Academic Integrity.

In 2003, Knapp was appointed by the governor of Georgia to develop principles of ethical governance and lead training sessions for state agencies.

Knapp was raised Presbyterian and is an ordained elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA.)

He and his wife Kelly have five children.

Hope College's New President is John Knapp of Alabama's Samford University

Contact: Brian McVicar, MLive

Source: MLive

March 25, 2013 - John C. Knapp, who leads a center for ethics and leadership at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala., has been selected at the 12th president of Hope College.

Knapp, an expert in business ethics who for more than a decade served as president of a corporate communications firm, was unanimously approved for the job today by the college’s board of trustees.

He’s to take office July 1, replacing James E. Bultman, who has led the college since 1999.

“In our complex global society where change seems to be the one constant, an educated person must know how to learn, think critically, take multiple perspectives and apply new knowledge,” Knapp, who was raised Presbyterian, said in a statement.

Today’s announcement caps a nearly two-year search for a successor to Bultman, who announced his retirement in May 2011.

The college originally hoped to have a new president in place by the start of the current school year, but was forced to extend the search after a committee in May 2012 passed on recommending a successor. Michael Le Roy, who this school year took over as president of Calvin College, was among those who interviewed for the position.

In prepared remarks, trustees praised Knapp’s experience in “helping Christians understand how to bridge their faith to their work and daily lives.”

“Dr. Knapp is well known by, and has an excellent reputation with, leaders in Christian higher education across the globe,” said Mary Bauman, chair of Hope’s board. “We are confident that will only enhance Hope’s efforts to become a destination institution for students and faculty who value an excellent academic program in the context of the historic Christian faith.”

The Christian, liberal arts college – affiliated with the Reformed Church in America – enrolled about 3,340 students in fall 2012, the highest number in its history. Tuition, room and board at the college is listed as $37,530 for the 2013-14 school year.

Prior to coming to [Stamford], where he founded the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership, Knapp previously was a professor at Georgia State University. There, he served as the director of the Center for Ethics and Corporate Responsibility at the university’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business.

Knapp praised Hope as an institution that’s exceptional at “melding the highest standards of academic rigor with a solid foundation in the Christian faith.”

“By doing so in a uniquely inviting and ecumenical culture, Hope delivers an undergraduate experience that is second to none in Christian higher education,” he said.

Samford's Knapp Elected President of Hope College

Contact: Philip Poole, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

March 25, 2013 - John C. Knapp, founding director of Samford University's Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership, has been named the next president of Hope College effective July 1. Knapp was elected the 12th president of Hope by the college's board of trustees March 25.

Hope College is a four-year, co-educational, Christian liberal arts college affiliated with the Reformed Church in America.

In announcing the election to the Samford community, Samford Provost and Executive Vice President J. Bradley Creed said, "This is a great opportunity for John and further affirms the quality of leaders we have here at Samford University. I appreciate the outstanding job he has done with that program in building a strong foundation for the future.

"I know you will join me in congratulating John, in thanking him for his service to Samford and in praying for his family as they make this transition to a new opportunity of service."

Creed said he would work with Knapp through the transition and that the search for a new director for the Mann Center would begin soon.

Read a complete story on Knapp's election at www.hope.edu.

Note: This story includes information provided by the Hope College office of public relations. Additional news stories are available online.

HEaL Institute To Present 'Marketplace Medicine and Conflicts of Interest'

Contact: William Nunnelley, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

March 19, 2013 - Samford University's Healthcare Ethics and Law Institute (HEAL) will examine "Marketplace Medicine and Conflicts of Interest" during its annual conference Friday, April 12.

The conference--sponsored by Samford's McWhorter School of Pharmacy--is designed to help Alabama institutional ethics committees at all levels of development and expertise with some of today's most pressing health-care ethics and law issues and problems. It will meet in Brock Forum of Dwight Beeson Hall at Samford from 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.

Dr. Carl Elliott, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the Center for Bioethics and Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School, will discuss "Fear and Loathing in Medical Research" as the program's keynote speaker.

Leonard J. "Jack" Nelson, a professor in Samford's Cumberland School of Law, will speak on "Health-Care Reform and the Market" at 10:45 a.m. as the conference's other invited speaker. Nelson teaches torts and health-care law.

The program also will include a panel discussion, break-out sessions and a case study. Bruce White, D.O. and J.D., is director of HEAL. For information and registration, contact www.samford.edu/heal or Ilaina Andrews at isandrew@samford.edu or (205) 726-2820.

Elliott will receive a Pellegrino Medal for his contributions to healthcare ethics during the conference luncheon. The medal is named for Dr. Edmund D. Pellegrino, the first recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. The medal has been presented to world renowned clinical ethicists by the HEAL Institute over the 12 years of its existence.

Elliott was on the faculty at McGill University in Canada prior to his 1997 appointment at Minnesota. He has held postdoctoral or visiting appointments at the University of Chicago, University of Otaga (New Zealand), East Carolina University and the University of Natal Medical School (now the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine). He also has held visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J., and Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University.

Elliott also serves on the faculty of the Minnesota Department of Philosophy and as an adjunct member of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He is the author of seven books, and has written articles for The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, The London Review of Books and The New England Journal of Medicine.

Mann Center Leads New Consortium on Academic Integrity, Plans Other New Initiatives

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

March 19, 2013 - The Mann Center is leading the formation of a regional consortium on academic integrity, comprising colleges and universities in the Southeastern US. The consortium is part of the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI) at Clemson University and will be formally launched during the inaugural Southeastern Regional Academic Integrity Conference at Samford in April.

This collaboration continues a long and productive relationship between the Mann Center and ICAI. Most recently, Mann Center program manager Azalea Hulbert spoke at ICAI's annual conference in San Antonio in February 2013, sharing insights into the center's work to date, while Mann Center director John Knapp is a charter board member of the Rutland Institute for Ethics, where ICAI is housed at Clemson.

Over the next few months, the Mann Center plans to launch several other initiatives to promote academic integrity, releasing a series of video vignettes and implementing new programs for graduate and international students. Information on these initiatives will be available online.

Since 2011, the Mann Center has worked with faculty and students in Samford's schools to identify ways to reduce academic dishonesty; appointed a group of student leaders, the Academic Integrity Advocates, who help identify and plan opportunities for student-focused programming; and employed the center's successful Courageous Conversations and Better World Theatre programs to deliver impactful messages about academic integrity.

Lincoln Scholar Richard Carwardine Visits Samford, Delivers Annual Hodges Lecture

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

March 19, 2013 - Noted Lincoln scholar Richard Carwardine, president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford, UK, and author of Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power, visited Samford University on February 18th and 19th. His visit was timely, as 2013 marks both the 50th anniversary of Birmingham's most violent civil rights struggles and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

During his visit Dr. Carwardine sat down with Mann Center director John Knapp to discuss Abraham Lincoln and his legacy of leadership. Their conversation, part of the center's ongoing series of interviews with thought leaders on topics of current interest, is available below.

Dr. Carwardine joined a panel of Samford faculty to discuss Antebellum religious thought. The conversation, "'God's Institution' or Gross Injustice? Slavery and Religion before the Civil War," paid special attention to Christian perspectives on the injustices of slavery. Faculty panelists included Dr. John Mayfield (History), Dr. Joe Scrivner (Religion), and Dr. Jason Wallace (History). Before the discussion, the Mann Center hosted a special reception in collaboration with the Samford University Library, which presented a display of artifacts related to the university's early history.

The highlight of Dr. Carwardine’s visit was the 2013 A. Gerow Hodges Lecture in Ethics and Leadership for an audience of around 700 in Reid Chapel. His topic, "Abraham Lincoln and the Challenge of Emancipation," focused on the moral issues faced by Lincoln, and his ability to lead effectively during the turbulence of the Civil War.

Healthcare Ethics and Law (HEaL) Conference to Feature Signature Mann Center Pedagogy

Contact: Azalea Hulbert, Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

March 19, 2013 - On April 12th Samford will host the annual Healthcare Ethics and Law (HEaL) Conference, "Marketplace Medicine and Conflicts of Interest." Featured speakers are Carl Elliott, M.D., Ph.D. and Leonard (Jack) Nelson III, J.D., LL.M. Dr. Elliott, a professor with the Center for Bioethics at the University of Minnesota, will also receive the 2013 Pellegrino Medal, Samford’s recognition of national leadership in healthcare ethics. Mr. Nelson is a member of the faculty at Samford’s Cumberland School of Law. A panel discussion with faculty from Samford and UAB is also planned. A full schedule and registration information are available here.

As part of the conference, the Mann Center will facilitate an interactive afternoon session for practitioners, using its distinctive Better World Theatre pedagogy to encourage audience engagement with ethical questions. Student participants will present a short play, "Just a Problem of Time", then lead the audience in a discussion of the ethical issues involved. While this pedagogy has been used effectively in the schools of nursing and business, this will mark the first time that it has been used for a professional audience.

Video: The Samford Chronicle

Contact: Brad Radice, Samford Office of Communication



Lincoln Chose a Winning Moment to Proclaim Emancipation: Carwardine

Contact: William Nunnelley, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

February 19, 2013 - President Abraham Lincoln first read his proposed Emancipation Proclamation to his Cabinet July 22, 1862, but it was a full two months before he issued the historic document publicly, Lincoln scholar Richard Carwardine (right) said at Samford University Feb. 19.

One reason for the delay was the poor progress of the Civil War, Dr. Carwardine noted. "(Secretary of State William) Seward urged waiting for a military victory," he said, but the news from the battlefield continued to be bad as "(Confederate General Robert E.) Lee invaded Maryland."

It was not until Sept. 23 that Lincoln made the proclamation public, after the Battle of Antietam Sept. 17. Antietam was "no great Union triumph, but it was enough of a success to drive Lee out of Maryland and let Lincoln act," Carwardine said in his award-winning book, Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power. The proclamation stated that, on Jan. 1, 1863, all people held as slaves in those parts of the Union still in rebellion "shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free."

Carwardine, an American history specialist and president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford, U.K., delivered Samford's Andrew Gerow Hodges Lecture on Ethics and Leadership, speaking to about 700 students and others in Reid Chapel. His book won the 2004 Lincoln Prize for the best book on the Civil War.

During the two-month delay, Lincoln bought time with his public answer to New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley, who on Aug. 19 accused the President of "disdain of twenty million freedom-loving Unionists and of pampering the border states."

In a response to Greeley in the Washington Chronicle, Lincoln said, "My paramount objective in this struggle is to save the union, and it is not either to save or destroy slavery." Lincoln added, "If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it."

In closing his letter to Greeley, he said, "I have here stated my purpose according to my view of official duty; and I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men every where could be free."

Carwardine called it "an adroit answer" because it reassured radicals that Lincoln was preparing for a dramatic step and conservatives that he had no such intention. But the historian said there was no misunderstanding of where Lincoln stood personally because he had built his reputation during the 1850s on his "earnest opposition to slavery." He quoted Lincoln as saying, "If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong."

The historian noted that the 2012 movie Lincoln showed that the President "used all his wiles to gain emancipation," portraying him as a "shrewd party operative."

During a panel discussion Feb. 18, Carwardine described Lincoln as "profoundly moral," "driven by injustice" and a man with "deep belief in natural rights." He said Lincoln believed "to deprive a slave of the fruits of his labor was an affront to justice."

The lecture and panel discussion were sponsored by Samford's Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership. The Hodges lectureship is named for the Samford graduate and longtime trustee and supporter of the University.

Lincoln Scholar Carwardine To Deliver Hodges Lectures

Contact: William Nunnelley, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

February 4, 2013 - Historian Richard Carwardine, president of Corpus Christi College of the University of Oxford, U.K., and author of an award-winning book on Abraham Lincoln, will deliver the Andrew Gerow Hodges Lectures Feb. 18-19. The lectures, sponsored by Samford's Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership, are open to the public [and] free.

Dr. Carwardine's book, Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power, won the 2004 Lincoln Prize given for the best non-fiction work on the Civil War. Administered by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College, the prize provides a $50,000 award to the recipient.

Carwardine will participate in a panel discussion on the topic "'God's Institution' or Gross Injustice? Slavery and Religion before the Civil War" Monday, Feb. 18, at 6 p.m. in Bolding Studio. Joining the panel will be Samford religion professor Joe Scrivner and history professors John Mayfield and Jason Wallace.

Carwardine will speak on "Abraham Lincoln and the Challenge of Emancipation" Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 10 a.m. in Reid Chapel.

A former history student at Corpus Christi College, Carwardine was elected president in 2010. Corpus Christi is the 12th oldest of Oxford's component colleges, dating to 1517. It specializes in the study of classics.

Carwardine served previously as Rhodes Professor of American History at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, and as professor of American history at the University of Sheffield in the U.K. He is the author of four books and numerous articles in scholarly journals.

Black History Month Offers Multitude of Programs

Contact: William Nunnelley, Samford Office of Communication

Source: Samford Office of Communication

January 29, 2013 - Samford University will sponsor a series of Black History Month and related programs during February. The theme will be "Lift Every Voice and Sing: Connecting the Past with the Future."

The programs will be free and open to the public. Most will be in Reid Chapel at 10 a.m. (Other program locations and times are listed in bold with the event.)

The speakers will include:

Feb. 5---Dr. Jonathan Bass, chair, history department, Samford University, "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail.’" Dr. Bass is author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated book, Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Martin Luther king, Jr., Eight White Religious Leaders and the ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail.’ A member of the faculty since 1998, he is also Samford’s University Historian.

Feb. 7---Timotheus Miller, senior, Wenonah High School, Birmingham. A group of Wenonah students will visit Samford for the program and have lunch with Samford Student Government Association members and Samford President Andrew Westmoreland.

Feb. 12---Dr. Raphael Warnock, senior pastor, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, Ga., the spiritual home of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Warnock also has served at Sixth Avenue Baptist Church, Birmingham; Abyssinian Baptist Church, New York City; and Douglas Memorial Community Church, Baltimore, Md.

Feb. 18---Andrew Gerow Hodges Lectures in Ethics and Leadership, sponsored by the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership, Panel Discussion, "'God's Institution' or Gross Injustice: Slavery Before the Civil War," led by Dr. Richard Carwardine, historian and president of Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, U.K., Bolding Studio, 6 p.m. Samford religion professor Joe Scrivner and history professors John Mayfield and Jason Wallace will join the panel.

Feb. 19---Andrew Gerow Hodges Lectures in Ethics and Leadership, sponsored by the Frances Marlin Mann Center for ethics and Leadership, Dr. Richard Carwardine, historian and president of Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, U.K., "Abraham Lincoln and the Challenge of Emancipation." Dr. Carwardine's book, Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power, won the 2004 Lincoln Prize for the best nonfiction work on the Civil War.

Feb. 21---Mayor William Bell, City of Birmingham. Bell has served as Birmingham's 33rd mayor since 2010. Previously, he was president pro-tem of the Jefferson County Commission and the first African American president of the Birmingham City council. He was interim mayor of Birmingham in 1999. Bell's career in local politics spans more than 22 years.

Feb. 26---Dr. Elizabeth Sloan-Ragland, director, WJAB Public Radio, Huntsville, Ala. A 1973 graduate of Samford, she was the first African American female to reside in campus housing at the school. Following graduation, she began her communications career at Alabama Public Television. She joined Alabama A&M University, home of WJAB, several years later, and has remained there for most of her career.

Feb. 28---Cedric Sparks, executive director, Division of Youth Services, City of Birmingham. Sparks is a graduate of the University of Alabama and Miles College Law School.

Feb. 28---Thurgood Marshall Symposium, sponsored by the Black Law Students Association, Cumberland School of Law, "Confronting Modern Barriers to Civil Rights Advocacy in America," professor Tanya Hernandez, Fordham University School of Law, Carroll Courtroom, Robinson Hall, 11 a.m.

Dr. Denise Gregory, Samford chemistry professor and Black History Month co-chair, said, "I am very excited about the programming that has been put in place for Black History Month. Several members of Samford's community have worked to secure the exceptional speakers we will meet in February. I look forward to seeing all of Samford enriched through these planned events."

Jay Roberson, Samford associate athletics director, also serves as a Black History Month co-chair.

Mann Center Emphasizes Faculty Role in the Moral Development of College Students

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

January 16, 2013 - Neuroscience research is yielding new insights into the development of young adults, showing that the college years may be prime time to acquire competencies in ethical recognition, reasoning and action. As the prefrontal cortex matures in the later stages of brain development, it becomes possible to engage in more complex reasoning; to take into account the wider and longer-term consequences of actions; and to deal more competently with ambiguous or conflicting moral claims.

This phenomenon is among many topics explored in the Mann Center’s workshop, “The Moral Development of College Students.” Offered most recently to the faculty of the Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing, the seminar encourages members of faculty to think in new ways about their roles in fostering student character and ethical competencies.

The Mann Center has identified three characteristics that should be recognizable in all Samford University graduates:

• Competent in ethical recognition, reasoning and action.

• Committed to lifelong development of virtuous character and spiritual maturity.

• Prepared for moral agency in navigating the increasingly complex social and ethical demands of life in families, organizations, professions, and society.

“Minimally, students must learn the compliance requirements in various fields of practice – professionally and by code examples,” said Mann Center Director John C. Knapp. “Ideally, they should learn to employ moral judgment to adjudicate between competing claims, obligations and values.”

The workshop covers formal and informal influences on moral development, showing how each member of the faculty can play a crucial role in this process. “College life can and does affect moral development – for better or for worse,” said Dr. Knapp. “We must recognize that many students are questioning the values and beliefs of their upbringing as they formulate their own moral identities. In the midst of this developmental journey, they are making important life decisions with moral implications. We must be intentional about equipping them to navigate life's challenges.”

Noted Lincoln Scholar to Give Hodges Lecture Commemorating Emancipation's 150th Anniversary

Source: Insights in Ethics and Leadership

January 16, 2013 - Richard Carwardine, president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford, will speak February 19 on the topic, "Abraham Lincoln and the Challenge of Emancipation." A noted historian and author of an award-winning biography of Lincoln, Dr. Carwardine will discuss the continuing significance of the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by Lincoln 150 years ago.

The 10 a.m. lecture in Reid Chapel is the Mann Center's 2013 A. Gerow Hodges Lecture in Ethics and Leadership.

An evening event on Monday, February 18, will feature Dr. Carwardine in a panel discussion of how the issue of slavery divided the Christian community between the nation's founding and the Civil War. He is researching a new book on the influence of religion on American culture during these formative decades. The panel will also include three Samford faculty members Dr. Joe Scrivner, Dr. John Mayfield, and Dr. Jason Wallace. This 6 p.m. program in Bolding Studio will be preceded by a reception and exhibit of artifacts from the period, provided by Samford University's archivist.

The Christian community was still deeply divided over race 100 years later, when in 1963 the struggle for African-American civil rights reached a crescendo in Birmingham, Alabama. The February programs are part of a series of events in 2013 marking the 50th anniversary of the most violent year in this city's history.

Contacts

 

Drayton Nabers, Jr.
Director
205.726.4362

dnabers@samford.edu

Brooks Hall, 227A

 

C. Cameron Collins 
Program Manager
205.726.4634
Brooks Hall, 227B

Mitzi Lafferty  
Administrative Assistant
205.726.4366
Brooks Hall, 227
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 The Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership emphasizes the indispensable connection between ethics and good leadership in business, government, social services and the classic professions. Much of the center’s work is at this vital nexus of ethics and leadership. 

Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership
800 Lakeshore Drive
Birmingham, AL 35229
205-726-4634 or Cameron Collins, Program Manager