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Samford in the News – March 24-31, 2014

Posted on 2014-04-02 by Philip Poole (205) 726-2823

A round-up of selected Samford University references in news outlets around the nation. It is compiled by the Office of Marketing and Communication from the university's media tracking service and may not be a comprehensive list. 

M.B.A. Alumnus' New Job Gets National Media Coverage

The appointment of 1999 M.B.A. graduate William Douglass as Group Head and Managing Director ofCIT Corporate Finance, Healthcare, has drawn extensive national media attention. The stories reference his Samford connection. "William's extensive experience in corporate banking, leveraged lending and middle market healthcare finance makes him the ideal person to lead our Healthcare group," said Jim Hudak, CIT president. "His management and leadership skills fit well with our client-focused and industry centric model."

Newton Speaks on New SAT

In a story distributed by nerdwallet.com, education associate dean Jodi Newton discussed the impact of the new Scholastic Aptitude Test for college admission. "The goal is to assess the student's talent and ability. A strong multi-criterion rubric could help ensure that a student's talent, academic ability, work ethic, service, and leadership are all considered," Newton said.

Music Alumni Getting National Attention with Band

Allen Branstetter and Ben Griner, 2013 music graduates, are generating local and national media coverage personally and for Samford as a result of their work with the Birmingham-based band St. Paul and the Broken Bones. This included a March 30 performance on CBS Saturday Morning and several recent mentions on NPR. In a recent profile on Branstetter, published by his hometown Jasper (Ala.) Daily Mountain Eagle, he said the band's success has put a hold on his plans for law school. "Whatever the future holds," he says, "I'm glad to be along for the ride."


Helms' Research on Community Service Being Quoted Nationally

Research on the value of community service by business by business faculty member Sara Helms is being quoted nationally in several media outlets, including a recent story distributed by Education Week. "I'm pro-service learning," Helms said. "However, I think it matters how we implement it. What you hear over and over in the literature is, don't require service learning; give incentives. We get very nervous about requiring people to do something because it's good."

Jackson, White Quoted on Student-Athletes as Employees

In response to a recent ruling that student-athletes should be considered employees of a university, business faculty member Darin White was featured in an interview aired by Birmingham's ABC affiliate.  White, who coordinates Samford's sports marketing program, said calling student athletes 'employees' opens up Pandora's Box. "For example, their scholarships would now be 'taxable' income. If you had a player who left or was "fired" he or she could possibly receive unemployment benefits. There's a number of issues that haven't been thought out very well I think."  Law faculty member Donald Jackson also was interviewed on the topic in a story picked up nationally by several media outlets. Jackson believes the case will wind up in the nation's highest court. "The next step, whether the university or the players prevail, will probably be litigated in the federal system and could wind up in the Supreme Court." 

Brewer Recalls Similarities Between Medicare and ACA Debate

In a story distributed by al.com, retired law professor Albert Brewer compared the debate on whether Alabama should support the current Affordable Care Act and the debate when Medicare was first proposed in 1966. "Of course, the primary concern for us was: How much is it going to cost? … We wanted to provide benefits," said Brewer, who was Alabama's governor at the time. "The extent we could provide them depended on what we could afford," he said in an interview. "I don't recall any real opposition."

Strickland Speaks to Impact of Texas Abortion Law in Alabama

Law school faculty member and dean-elect Henry (Corky) Strickland said in an interview on Birmingham's ABC affiliate that a recent court decision in Texas making abortion laws more restrictive may or may not have a bearing on Alabama laws. Strickland said Federal Judge Myron Thompson, here in Alabama, doesn't have to follow the decision made in Texas. "The court has to look at whether the regulation places an undue burden on the woman's right to choice, particularly in the first trimester and parts of the pregnancy where abortion is constitutionally protected."

Tomlin Discusses Important Role of Samford's Evening College

In interviews aired by Birmingham's NBC affiliate, Evening College executive director Laura Tomlin dispelled some of the myths about returning to college at mid-point in life or career. "There are a lot of myths that people believe they have to overcome: feeling too old to go back; it will take too long; hard to balance work, family and school; and bad experience in school at an earlier age. There are some options for people who want to go back to school." 

Stokes' Research Cited in New York Times

Research by sociology faculty member Chuck Stokes was referenced in a recent New York Times op-ed column by Ross Douthat. Practicing conservative Protestants have much lower divorce rates, and practicing believers generally divorce less frequently than the secular and unaffiliated, Douthat quotes Stokes as saying. But the lukewarmly religious are a different matter. What Stokes calls "nominal" conservative Protestants, who attend church less than twice a month, have higher divorce rates even than the nonreligious.

Based on the university's media tracking services, Samford received 186 mentions in various media outlets during this period. Other stories that generated multiple local, regional and/or national attention included athletics, arts events and a local congressional debate held on campus.

 

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