March 31, 2006

Samford, Washington Post Establish Robinson Forum; Columnist David Broder To Speak April 11

"...David Broder, Pulitzer prize-winning Post political columnist who is syndicated in more than 300 newspapers including The Birmingham News, will deliver the first Timothy Sumner Robinson Lecture Tuesday, April 11, at 7:30 p.m. in Reid Chapel at Samford..."

David BroderAt the end of the movie "All the President's Men," a series of 10 Washington Post newspaper clippings about the Watergate trials appears in the background. Eight of the 10 are by the same reporter: Tim Robinson.

The Dora, Ala., native and Samford University graduate covered Watergate in his role as U.S. District Court reporter for The Post during the mid-1970s. One year, he had more front page bylines than any Post reporter.

Samford and The Post recently established the Timothy Sumner Robinson Forum to bring nationally known speakers to Samford each year. The program honors Robinson, who died unexpectedly at age 58 in 2003 from complications following cancer surgery.

David Broder, Pulitzer prize-winning Post political columnist who is syndicated in more than 300 newspapers including The Birmingham News, will deliver the first Timothy Sumner Robinson Lecture Tuesday, April 11, at 7:30 p.m. in Reid Chapel at Samford. The public is invited free.

Broder and Robinson were staff members and friends at The Post during the '70s.

In addition to the lecture, Broder and Post deputy managing editor Milton Coleman will visit Samford journalism classes. The Post also established an annual two-week internship at the newspaper for a Samford journalism student.

"The Timothy Sumner Robinson Forum would not be a reality without Milton Coleman's support and the work he did behind the scenes to make this possible," said Douglas Wilson, Samford development officer. "This will be an outstanding opportunity for Samford students, and this ongoing partnership will benefit the community as well."

Robinson covered the civil rights movement for United Press International and The Birmingham Post-Herald before joining The Post in 1969. Later, he was editor of the National Law Journal in New York City, America's largest selling legal publication.

More Info