Samford University

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Excavations at Shikhin

The Excavations at Shikhin is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international, cultural heritage project whose goal is the recovery and preservation of the site of Shikhin in the Lower Galilee of Israel. Samford University is the primary sponsoring institution. Professor James Riley Strange of Samford University, USA, serves as Director. Associate Directors are Professor Mordechai Aviam of Kinneret College and the Institute of Galilean Archaeology, Israel, and Professor David Fiensy of Kentucky Christian University, USA.

The archaeology is done by volunteers from all over, many of them students from Samford University, Centre College, University of South Florida, and Kinneret College. No experience is necessary in order to participate.

Apply to participate in the Excavations at Shikhin. Samford students will apply to study abroad at the Office of International Studies.

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History of the Site

Spanning the lifetime of Jesus, the ancient village of Shikhin perched on a low knoll in the lush hills and broad valleys of the Tuscany of Israel: the Lower Galilee.
History of the Site
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Importance of the Site

Because Shikhin sat a scant mile from Sepphoris (around a 20-minute walk), and over the same Roman highway that the city oversaw, the site stands to teach us much about Galilean village life in relation to the city.
Importance of the Site
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History of Excavations

 In 1988 a survey team from the University of South Florida Excavations at Sepphoris mapped out the two northern peaks of Shikhin and located many features of archaeological interest.
History of Excavations
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The Dig Experience

We start early to beat the heat and are finished by 12:30 p.m. Gone are the days of living in tents!
The Dig Experience
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The Field School

At the Excavations at Shikhin, all volunteers are trained in archaeological excavation and recording methods.
The Field School
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Volunteer Info

Students register for RELG 393 Field Methods in Archaeology, which is offered for four hours of credit.
Volunteer Info
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