Victoria  Knierim
Assistant Professor, Core Curriculum, Coordinator, Academic Enrichment
Howard College of Arts and Sciences
Communication Arts
Office: Brooks Hall 109
Email: vsknieri@samford.edu
Phone: 205-726-4531
Originally from St. Louis, MO, Victoria Knierim lived in Nashville, TN, for 16 years before moving to the Birmingham area. While in Nashville, she worked as a freelance writer and editor, earned her Bachelor of Arts in English at Tennessee State University, worked as the Director of the Mt. Juliet Public Library, and then returned to school to earn her Master of Arts in English at Middle Tennessee State University. She began her teaching career at Middle Tennessee State University where she taught both Basic Writing in the Developmental Studies Department and Expository Writing in the English Department. She also worked as the Co-Director of the Developmental Studies Writing Lab at MTSU.

In addition to her classroom duties, Knierim serves as Coordinator of Academic Enrichment in the Howard College of Arts and Sciences and was recently named Coordinator of the newly formed John Howard Scholars Program. Knierim also advises undeclared students and serves on the steering committee for Samford’s Center for Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship.

Knierim is always looking for ways to help students succeed. In her Communication Arts classes, Knierim gives students the tools they need to be able to communicate effectively in a world where technology records and transmits their words in an instant. Her goal is to give students confidence in their own voices while holding them accountable for their own rhetoric. As an advisor and mentor, Knierim welcomes the opportunity to work with students to develop plans for long-term success.


Publications

Communication Arts: A Student’s Guide. 5th Edition. Samford University Press, 2014.        Contributor.

Communication Arts: A Student’s Guide. 4th Edition. Samford University Press, 2012. Co-editor (with Betsy Emmons) and Contributor

“Mina Shaughnessy.” Compbiblio: Leaders and Influences in Composition Theory and Practice. Ed. Allison D. Smith and Trixie G. Smith. Southlake, TX: Fountainhead, 2007.


Presentations

“Death, Dying, and Faith” in a First-Year Writing Seminar: Using Reformation Theology to Teach Threshold Concepts in Writing Studies.” Teaching the Christian Intellectual Tradition: Teaching the Reformations. Samford University. October 6-8, 2016.

“Turning Big Ideas into Best Practices through Communication and Collaboration.”             International Association for the Promotion of Christian Higher Education        (IAPCHE). Calvin College. Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. June 4-6, 2015.

 “‘It is more than just a grade.’ Redefining Success for Student Writers.” The 67th Annual Conference of the Association of College English Teachers of Alabama (ACETA). Fairhope, AL. March 13-14, 2015.

 “Exposing the Rhetoric of First-Year Writing Students by Examining the Power and          Limitations of Autobiography through a Rhetorical Analysis of Augustine’s Confessions using “Book Four” of De Doctrina Christiana. Teaching the Christian Intellectual Tradition: Augustine across the Curriculum. Samford University. October 2-4, 2014.

“Beyond Little Women: The Extraordinary Life of Louisa May Alcott.” Shelby County Library System. Sept. 15, 2011.

“The Writers’ Studio: Creating a Safe Space for Beginning Writers.” Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), Chicago, IL, March 22-25, 2006.

“Complex Gender Legacies of Alcott’s Little Women.” Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA), Milwaukee, WI, November 10-13, 2005.

“The Writers’ Studio: Creating a Safe Space for Beginning Writers.” The Tennessee Association for Developmental Education (TNADE), Chattanooga, TN, October 27, 2005.

“A Ghostly Presence: Female Victorian Writers and the Terrifying Tales They Told.” Graduate Conference, Middle Tennessee State University, April, 2005.

“The American Girl” Panel Discussion. Kentucky/Tennessee American Studies Association, Fall Creek Falls, TN March, 2004.

“Louisa May Alcott and the Fashioning of Female Adolescence in Nineteenth-Century America.” Kentucky/Tennessee American Studies Association, Fall Creek Falls, TN March, 2004.

“Alcott’s Moody Little Women.” Graduate Conference, Middle Tennessee State University, Spring 2003.

Degrees and Certifications

  • M.A. in English, Middle Tennessee State University, 2005
  • B.A. in English, Tennessee State University, 1993