Caroline  Crowley

Hometown

Dothan, Alabama

Undergraduate Institution and Graduation Year

Troy University, 2016

 

Legal Interests

Product Liability Defense

Hobbies

Kickboxing, trying new restaurants, hand lettering, gardening, and boating

What do you think is the best thing about Cumberland?

The faculty and staff at Cumberland astutely recognize the most important aspect of building a successful career is to be respected and respectful. Our professors encourage open discussion and emphasize the importance of gracefully communicating differing opinions. As future attorneys, we already bear the stigma of being generally disagreeable. I personally believe those who feel the need to belittle or berate an opponent do so out of self-doubt. As Cumberland students, we derive confidence from a profound knowledge of the law and the ability to construct clever legal arguments. This self-assuredness affords Cumberland students the ability to form and maintain respected reputations.

Why did you choose Cumberland?

Cumberland’s focus on ethical practice was the determining factor in my law school decision. Realizing I wanted to practice law in Alabama, I knew I would be fortunate to practice in a closely-knit legal community with unique access to both local state and federal judges. Having a reputation for being a respected and ethical attorney is of utmost importance. Successful alumni worldwide embody Cumberland’s values of practicing with integrity, empathy, and a quiet confidence. The opportunity to join such an esteemed network is invaluable.

What do you most enjoy about studying law in Birmingham? What do you like to do in Birmingham?

As the largest city in Alabama, Birmingham attracts clients from all over the Southeast and beyond. This has given me the opportunity to explore areas of the law I had no clue existed. At the same time, the legal community in Birmingham is small enough that Cumberland students have immediate connections with alumni at nearly every firm. Most importantly to me, practicing in Birmingham will enable me to have a successful legal career and raise a family in a city extremely conducive to family life.

There is always something new and exciting to experience in Birmingham! In over a year of living here, my lists of “restaurants to try” is still too long to count. Some of my favorite Birmingham activities include attending concerts at Avondale or Oak Mountain Theater, shopping in downtown Homewood, spending the day floating the Cahaba River and hanging out at local breweries.

Cumberland Activities and Extracurricular Activities

Jere F. White Jr. Fellowship Scholar, Class of 2019; Cumberland Ambassadors; Volunteer Lawyers Program

If you could give any advice to your pre-law school self, what would you say? 

Do your own thing! I remember as a prospective law student, my first instinct was to gather all the advice I could. I quickly realized I was putting so much pressure on myself to conform to what I thought was the “right way.” There is no “right way” to do law school! As with all areas of life, it is so important to continue to be yourself. If you like to outline, make an outline! If you cannot stand being in the library, don’t study there! The list goes on forever. No matter how much people appear to have it together, everyone is nervous to begin as a 1L. The best thing you can do for yourself is to come to terms with what makes you uncomfortable. If you feel like a certain technique is not best for your preferences or personality, don’t continue to engage in that behavior simply because the rest of the crowd does. When you are brave enough to embrace your uniqueness, you make others comfortable enough to do the same. If you’ve made it this far, you have the capability to do whatever you set your mind to.

What do you plan to do after graduation?

I plan to live, work, and raise a family in Birmingham. I hope to work in a mid to large-size firm in an area of law that allows me to embrace my creativity. I plan to remain active in pro bono organizations throughout my career and one day return to Cumberland as an adjunct professor.