D. Wendy  Greene

D. Wendy Greene

Professor
Cumberland School of Law
Cumberland School of Law
Office: Robinson Hall 
Email: wendy.greene@samford.edu
Phone: 205-726-2419

Teaching & Research Interests: Comparative Slavery, Constitutional Law, Critical Race Theory, Employment Law, Employment Discrimination, Equitable Remedies, Race Relations Law & Real Property

Professor Doris “Wendy” Greene teaches Constitutional Law, Employment Law, Employment Discrimination, Equitable Remedies, Real Property, Race and American Law, Critical Race Theory, and a specialty course on Workplace Appearance Discrimination, Dress Codes, and the Law. Since entering the legal academy in 2007, Professor Greene has developed an international reputation for her cutting-edge scholarship on what she has coined “grooming codes discrimination” and has similarly become a leading expert on “misperception discrimination” in the workplace. She, too, is one of a few U.S. law professors actively engaged in the study of comparative slavery, racial classification, and race relations in the Americas and Caribbean. Notably, in 2010, Professor Greene’s comparative work on racial slavery and racial identity in Brazil and the United States was featured at Howard University in Washington, DC in her role as the Logan Lecturer on the African Diaspora and/or Black History.

Professor Greene’s scholarly works, which appear in reputed general and specialty law journals, are not simply widely cited but have also enjoyed significant real-world application. Her articles have shaped educational modules and professional training on workplace diversity and inclusion as well as the legal positions of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), federal and administrative law judges in race discrimination cases. In 2016, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals quoted Professor Greene’s award-winning article, Title VII: What’s Hair (and Other Race-Based Characteristics) Got to Do With It?), in EEOC v. Catastrophe Management Solutions, Inc., as legal authority on the social construction of race. Naturally, Professor Greene is a sought-after speaker. Having delivered her expertise on racial slavery and race relations in the Americas and Caribbean; identity, anti-discrimination, and equality law; and critical race theory at over 70 professional conferences in Canada, Europe, Latin America, the United States, and the Caribbean, she frequently addresses student, professional, and community organizations on topics related to: academic success in law school; diversity in the legal profession and legal education; and careers and professional development in legal academia.

For her professional service, innovative teaching and scholarship, Professor Greene has garnered both national and institutional recognition. In 2015, Professor Greene’s article, Categorically Black, White, or Wrong: “Misperception Discrimination” and the State of Title VII Protection, was awarded the Law and Society Association John Hope Franklin Prize: a distinctive national honor recognizing “exceptional scholarship in the field of Race, Racism, and the Law.” At Cumberland, Greene has twice earned the Lightfoot, Franklin, & White Award for Best Faculty Scholarship in 2009 (for her article, Title VII: What’s Hair (and Other Race-Based Characteristics) Got to Do With It?),and 2014 (for her articles Categorically Black, White, or Wrong: “Misperception Discrimination” and the State of Title VII Protection; and A Multidimensional Analysis of What Not To Wear in The Workplace: Hijabs and Natural Hair. In 2011, she was conferred the Harvey S. Jackson Excellence in Teaching Award for Upper Level Courses. In 2014, Professor Greene was one of 12 “standout” academicians named an “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and honored by her alma mater, Xavier University of Louisiana, as an inaugural young alumni award recipient. Professor Greene has also enjoyed the privilege of serving as the Inaugural Scholar in Residence at St. Thomas University School of Law (Miami) in 2014 and as the Scholar in Residence at Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law in 2015.

In addition to maintaining a dynamic teaching and scholarly agenda, between 2012 and 2014 Professor Greene served as Cumberland’s Director of Faculty Development and between 2010 and 2012 as Co-Chair of Cumberland’s Faculty Development Committee. She is actively involved in myriad professional communities and the community-at-large. Greene is the immediate past Chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Section on Women in Legal Education and an Executive Committee member of the AALS Section on Employment Discrimination, having served since 2013. Among other committees, Professor Greene has also served on: the 2015 American Society for Legal History Program Committee; the ACLU of Alabama Board of Directors; the Birmingham Civil Rights Summer Voting Rights Series Steering Committee; the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute Human Rights Symposium Community Advisory Committee; the Lutie Lytle Black Women Law Faculty Writing Workshop Planning Committee; the National Bar Association Law Professors Division Executive Committee; and the Southeast/Southwest People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference Executive Committee. In 2012, Professor Greene served as the Conference Chair of the SE/SW People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference, drawing approximately 60 academics, practitioners, and laws students to Cumberland. The leadership of the National Bar Association Law Professors Division and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute has publicly recognized Professor Greene for her devoted service and commitment to civil rights advocacy respectively. Moreover, she was recently selected to serve on the National Chair’s Education Task Force for the National Black Law Students Association.

A native of Columbia, SC, Professor Greene is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana (cum laude, B.A. with Honors in English and a double minor in African American Studies and Spanish); Tulane University Law School (J.D.); and The George Washington University School of Law (LL.M.). Prior to law teaching, she was employed with a D.C. lobbying firm and a Houston, Texas boutique labor and employment law firm.

In the spring of 2017, Professor Greene will serve as a visiting professor at the University of Kentucky College of Law, where she will teach Constitutional Law I and Constitutional Law II.

Degrees and Certifications

  • LL.M., The George Washington University Law School
  • J.D., Tulane University Law School
  • B.A., Cum Laude, English, Xavier University of Louisiana

Awards and Honors

  • Scholar in Residence, Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law (Fall 2015)
  • Harvey S. Jackson Excellence in Teaching Award for Upper Level Courses, 2011
  • Lightfoot, Franklin & White Award for Best Faculty Scholarship, 2009 & 2014
  • “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine (2014)
  • Law and Society Association John Hope Franklin Prize Recipient, 2015
  • Inaugural Scholar in Residence, St. Thomas University School of Law--Miami (Fall 2014)

Publications

  • All in the Family: Interracial Intimacy, Racial Fictions, and the Law, Review of Angela Onwuachi-Willig, ACCORDING TO OUR HEARTS: RHINELANDER V. RHINELANDER AND THE LAW OF THE MULTIRACIAL FAMILY (YALE UNIV. PRESS 2013), 4 CAL. L. REV. CIRCUIT 179 (2013)
  • Categorically Black, White, or Wrong: "Misperception Discrimination" and the State of Title VII Protection, 47 MICH. J. L. REF. 101 (2013)
  • A Multidimensional Analysis of What Not to Wear in the Workplace: Hijabs and Natural Hair, 8 FIU L. REV. 333 (2013)
  • Black Women Can’t Have Blonde Hair . . . in the Workplace, 14 J. GENDER RACE & JUST. 405 (2011)
  • Pretext Without Context, 75 MO. L. REV. 403 (2010)
  • On Race, Nationhood and Citizenship, Review of Laura E. Gómez’s MANIFEST DESTINIES: THE MAKING OF THE MEXICAN AMERICAN RACE, 34 T. MARSHALL L. REV. 421 (2010)
  • Determining the (In)determinable: Race in Brazil and the United States, 14 MICH. J. RACE & L. 143 (2009)
  • Title VII: What’s Hair (And Other Race-Based Characteristics) Got to Do With It? 79 U. COLO. L. REV. 1355 (2008)

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