Continuing Education

Tuesday, December 5

3 to 5 p.m., College of Health Sciences, 2205

A View to the Future

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, or ASHA, has identified clinical supervision as a content area requiring comprehensive, specialized training. Supervision is a distinct area of practice. In alignment with this initiative, this workshop on clinical supervision will discuss adult learning styles, collaborative models of supervision, identify features of reflective practice, discuss supervision/teaching continuum and mentorship, outline strategies for effective supervision and communication, and provide strategies for developing students’ critical thinking skills. The presenters will engage the audience in a variety of active learning activities.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Learner Outcome 1: Identify the features of reflective practice
  • Learner Outcome 2: Discuss strategies for effective supervision and communication
  • Learner Outcome 3: Discuss strategies for developing critical thinking skills

Agenda

  • 3:00 - 3:30: Introduction and Overview of ASHA Phased-In Training
  • 3:30 – 3:45: Adult Learning Styles/Strategies for Critical Thinking
  • 3:45 – 4:15: The Continuum of Supervision Model; Collaborative Model of Supervision
  • 4:15 – 4:30: Strategies of Reflective Practice
  • 4:30 – 4:50: Small Group Discussion of Strategies
  • 4:50 – 5:00: Q&A; Wrap-Up

Speaker

Carol Koch

Carol Koch, Ed.D., CCC-SLP is currently a professor at Samford University. Koch completed her B.S. and M.A. at Central Michigan University in 1986 and 1987, respectively. She completed her Ed.D. in Education and Speech-Language Pathology in 2009 at Nova Southeastern University. Her doctoral dissertation focused on the content of written feedback provided by supervisors to speech-language pathology graduate student clinicians. Koch was previously at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri, where she served as clinical coordinator, department chair and associate professor during her nine-year tenure there. In addition to her higher education experience, she has approximately 30 years of clinical experience. Her clinical focus has been primarily with infants, toddlers and preschoolers, with particular clinical expertise in the areas of speech sound disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, autism spectrum disorders and feeding and swallowing disorders.