Published on April 13, 2021 by Sara Roman  
MAVEN

In July of 2020 Moffett & Sanders School of Nursing welcomed its inaugural cohort of nurse practitioner residents. Over the past 10 months, the residents have served in their clinical placements, participated in weekly didactic lessons and completed hands-on training intensives, and through a new partnership with The MAVEN Project, these experiences have been enhanced. 

The MAVEN Project, a nonprofit organization that links primary care providers in underserved communities with experienced volunteer physicians via telehealth, has afforded residents with a connection to a broad network of seasoned clinicians across the country. “We have access to specialists who are the best in their field and who offer their time and expertise to our residents through three outlets: educational sessions, mentoring, and consultations,” said Jessica Wukasch, health education coordinator for the Nurse Practitioner Residency Program.

The MAVEN Project utilizes telehealth technology to bring comprehensive care, education and mentoring to providers and patients across the county. Telehealth is an evolving tool to provide patient care. It utilizes telecommunication devices to provide health care delivery. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of telehealth readily expanded to allow for the continuation of care for routine doctor’s office visitors.

“More than ever before technology is playing a pivotal role in the timeliness of consults and the ability to provide real-time care to patients,” said Wukasch. “It has become increasingly essential that new clinicians be adept at using this model of care.” 

The residents have participated in several sessions that not only enhance their knowledge base on the subject matter but also train them on how to utilize telehealth when providing care to a patient with that specific condition. Thus far, the residents have participated in sessions varying from lab tests in rheumatic disease to medication non-adherence and they have access to consultations and training from over 40 specialties.

The partnership has also provided each resident with an individual mentor. “The mentorship opportunity gives residents an outlet to discuss cases or personal experiences that are shaping their first year of practice and, inevitably, their future,” said Wukasch.

Faculty and students report that the partnership has been a stable and strong part of the didactic piece of the Nurse Practitioner Residency Program and that they hope it will continue to develop and grow in the coming years.

To learn more about Moffett & Sanders School of Nursing’s Nurse Practitioner Residency Program visit samford.edu/nursing/residencies.