Published on February 27, 2020 by Morgan Black  
Carden Art
Associate professor of economics Art Carden is a regular panelist and speaker at many economics forums in Alabama and across the country.
 
Recently, professor Carden presented an economic forecast for two groups: the Commercial Real Estate Women and a small group of builders and contractors. He also spoke at the Foundation for Economic Education Economics Workshop at Red Mountain Community School in Avondale about centralized versus decentralized planning.
 
In January, Carden attended a faculty retreat for the American Enterprise Institute’s (AEI) Initiative on Faith and Public Life in Houston, Texas, and the Liberty Fund Conference focused on “Liberty, Growth and Justice” in Tucson, Arizona.
 
Professor Carden is a regular contributor to the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) where he is a senior fellow, as well as a regular contributor to Forbes. His recent commentaries can be found here:
 
AIER Forbes
 
Additionally, professor Carden has written a review of the book Socialism Sucks. His review titled “Choking Down Socialism” was included in the Winter 2019/2020 issue of Regulation, the Cato Institute’s publication. It can found here.
 
 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and U.S. News & World Report ranks Samford 37th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 97th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,758 students from 48 states and 22 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 3rd nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.