Published on August 3, 2021 by Morgan Black  
Thornton Jeremy

Jeremy Thornton, associate dean and the Dwight Moody Beeson chair of business in Samford's Brock School of Business, recently served as an economic expert for an article for New Orleans Public Radio, a National Public Radio station. In the story, Thornton talks about the challenges in the current economy as it relates to unemployment. 

The story titled, As the Clock Runs Out On $300 Unemployment Benefits, A New New Orleans Waitress Is Left In Limbo , features New Orleans, Louisiana, resident Dora Whitfield as she faces a difficult decision of waiting to return to her old job with the possible removal of tipped pay, or seeking new employment.

According to the story, "economists say it is too early to determine the effect of smaller unemployment checks and that one of the biggest challenges to our current economy is that the jobs available do not match neatly with the people looking for jobs."

As an expert source, Thornton said, “We now have a mismatch of labor. Very rarely do we see these sharp demarcations where we just dramatically need a different economy than we had a year ago.”

Read the full story here.

 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and U.S. News & World Report ranks Samford 37th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 97th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,758 students from 48 states and 22 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 3rd nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.