Published on October 6, 2014  
Jim Brown

Samford University history professor Jim Brown will draw on decades of teaching memories and research for a discussion of his new book, FairyTales, Patriotism and the Nation-State; The Rise of the Modern West and the Response of the World, Homecoming Saturday, Nov. 1.  

The book, written primarily for college students, introduces readers to modern world history by blending history, folkways, geography and modern technology.

Brown said the project originated in his earliest teaching assignments at Samford and evolved through interaction with students, travel-study courses he taught with biologist colleagues and his involvement in what would become the university’s modern core curriculum. “Looking at it from this end of the process,” Brown said, “it’s clear that the book mostly grew out of a dialogue with Samford history students over the past forty-some years.”

Brown’s presentation will begin at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 1, in Christenberry Planetarium, a venue chosen to make best use of the projected Google Earth maps Brown developed for his book.

Seating in Christenberry Planetarium is limited to 94, so be sure to arrive early enough to secure a place!

 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and U.S. News & World Report ranks Samford 37th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 97th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,758 students from 48 states and 22 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 3rd nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.