Historians pose important questions about our world and search for deep explanations. History majors learn to think critically, to research well, and to communicate effectively. Every other academic discipline depends on historical explanations for their work. The history major has long been the choice of undergraduates seeking to develop a well-informed, sophisticated understanding of the world around us.

History classes at Samford are taught by award-winning teachers and acclaimed scholars. Our majors are on the leading edge of undergraduate research at Samford, connecting our campus to the community and the wider world.

Nancy Lipham
"I enjoyed not only the subject matter I studied but also the professors and the interaction between them and the students. When I left Samford I felt I was leaving my second home." Nancy Lipham - Senior Vice President, Investments, Wells Fargo Advisors

A history major prepares students for a broad range of careers and graduate degrees. Skills in research, critical thinking, and communication are valued by employers in many fields.

News

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Samford Sponsors Southern Historical Association Conference
Nearly 2,000 historians of the American South gathered in Birmingham for the event, which was funded, in part, by Samford’s Department of History, Howard College of Arts and Sciences, the Stockham Chair of Western Intellectual History and the Office of the Provost. 
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Samford To Host Computer Science Pioneer Rosalind Picard Oct. 4
Picard–inventor, electrical engineer, and founder and director of MIT’s Affective Computing Research Group–will describe building technology to help people manage stress, illness and autism, inventing sensors to measure emotion, making life-changing discoveries and facing the challenging question of what it means to be human. 
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Samford Students Explore Biology, Culture in Latin America
Led by biology professor Drew Hataway and history professor Carlos Alemán, the academically diverse group of 16 students in the Biology, Culture, and Revolution in Latin America course earned humanities and lab science credits over two weeks of travel and study.