Historians pose important questions about our world and search for deep explanations. History majors learn to think critically, to research well, and to communicate effectively. They tell the story of all of us–who we are and where we’ve been, what we’ve thought and said and done–so we can preserve our past and help shape our future.

Every other academic discipline depends on historical explanations for their work. The history major has long been the choice of undergraduates seeking to develop a well-informed, sophisticated understanding of the world around us.

History classes at Samford are taught by award-winning teachers and acclaimed scholars. Our majors are on the leading edge of undergraduate research at Samford, connecting our campus to the community and the wider world.

Nancy Lipham
"I enjoyed not only the subject matter I studied but also the professors and the interaction between them and the students. When I left Samford I felt I was leaving my second home." Nancy Lipham - Senior Vice President, Investments, Wells Fargo Advisors

A history major prepares students for a broad range of careers and graduate degrees. Skills in research, critical thinking, and communication are valued by employers in many fields.

News

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What Can You Do With That? New Resource Highlights Arts and Sciences Career Paths
The new Career Focus page includes links to external lists of careers in the humanities, STEM and social sciences, as well as news and feature articles showing how our students are refining their passions, finding mentors and creating custom academic pathways to the lives they want to live.  
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Stockham Scholars Program to Emphasize Christian Liberal Arts Tradition
Samford's Howard College of Arts and Sciences has announced a new academic program for outstanding humanities majors studying in the Christian liberal arts tradition. 
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Grant Will Support New Course on The United States In the World
The Stanton Foundation has awarded History Department chair Jonathan Den Hartog a $42,200 grant to develop a new course that will explore how the United States has made decisions to operate in the wider world.