Historians pose important questions about our world and search for deep explanations. History majors learn to think critically, to research well, and to communicate effectively. They tell the story of all of us–who we are and where we’ve been, what we’ve thought and said and done–so we can preserve our past and help shape our future.

Every other academic discipline depends on historical explanations for their work. The history major has long been the choice of undergraduates seeking to develop a well-informed, sophisticated understanding of the world around us.

History classes at Samford are taught by award-winning teachers and acclaimed scholars. Our majors are on the leading edge of undergraduate research at Samford, connecting our campus to the community and the wider world.

Nancy Lipham
"I enjoyed not only the subject matter I studied but also the professors and the interaction between them and the students. When I left Samford I felt I was leaving my second home." Nancy Lipham - Senior Vice President, Investments, Wells Fargo Advisors

A history major prepares students for a broad range of careers and graduate degrees. Skills in research, critical thinking, and communication are valued by employers in many fields.

News

Photo Carl Trueman
Samford To Host Carl Trueman Feb. 17
Trueman is professor of biblical and religious Studies at Grove City College, and author of The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution. 
Photo Samford history professor Delane Tew
In New Book, Tew Helps Introduce Baptists Who Challenged Denomination to Become More Progressive
Samford history professor Delane Tew brings to the work her own perspective as a former missionary as well as her academic expertise in Southern history, women’s history and church history. 
Photo Alex McClure Colvin
Historian Colvin Named Young Alumna of the Year
Prior to joining the Alabama Department of Archives and History, Alex McClure Colvin updated and digitized the collections of the Hermitage and reorganized its staff research library, and worked on the National Park Service’s Mapping Removal Project.