Published on April 15, 2014 by Katie Stripling  
Ashley Waddell

Pharmacy student Ashley Waddell received third runner up in the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Students Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) National Patient Counseling Competition. This is the highest placing any student from McWhorter School of Pharmacy has ever achieved in the annual competition; as one of the top four finalists, Waddell received a cash prize for her efforts.


The patient counseling competition encourages student pharmacists in their efforts toward becoming better patient educators and reinforces the role of the pharmacist as a health care provider and educator.

Waddell, a third year pharmacy student from Greenville, Tenn., competed against 127 student pharmacists from throughout the country at the 2014 APhA Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. on March 29 and 30. The competition was divided into the preliminary round and final round. During each, students selected scenarios at random and counseled a patient on safe and effective drug use.

Thirty four students and ten faculty members from McWhorter School of Pharmacy attended the conference and were there when Waddell received the third runner-up prize at the APhA-ASP Awards Celebration on March 30.

 

 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and U.S. News & World Report ranks Samford 37th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 97th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,758 students from 48 states and 22 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 3rd nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.