Monday Mission

Monday Mission, December 12, 2016

Emily Hynds, Chair of Mathematics and Computer Science and our Faculty Athletics Representative, often reminds me of the efforts of our student-athletes to attain academic progress.

She sent me this message a few days ago, illustrating the commitment of the members of the volleyball team as they hosted (and eventually won) the SoCon tournament:

After the win (in the tournament) on Sunday, it was decided that the volleyball team would not attend classes on Monday in order to prepare for the last night.  Kind of like it would be if the championship was somewhere else.  I spoke with Larry Harper, who has a couple of the players in his class this semester.  They had a test on Monday and he had communicated with them that he was more than happy to arrange for them to take it later.  They told him that they had found time on Sunday to prepare and that they would be in class on Monday to take the test, in spite of the fact that no one was requiring it!

The world is better because so many Samford students exceed expectations. 

Monday Mission, November 21, 2016

Stephen Stake, a Samford graduate, recently defended his doctoral dissertation in public health at Johns Hopkins University.

The title of his dissertation is “Intimate Partner Violence and Depressive Symptoms among Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Bangladesh.”  Dr. Stake took a few minutes to write to one of his Samford mentors, Dr. Stephen Chew:  

“Looking back, my education at Samford (particularly Psych) was top notch and prepared me for the masters and doctoral work.  I know you were a huge part of that and I’m thankful for your investment in me.  For the next few weeks I’ll be editing my three separate papers for journal submissions and then exploring a few jobs associated with Hopkins.  My two advisors work internationally, one in Uganda in IPV and mental health, the other in Bangladesh in maternal and child health.  There are a couple of other international jobs associated with my dissertation committee from Hopkins I am exploring next week as well.  I’m praying about next steps, but hoping to blend in a little more administration and program development with international focus.  After a fairly demanding season, I’m aiming to stay around Baltimore/DC area with international travel until next spring and then re-evaluate where God is calling me to.  I trust that He will guide as He has done before at every fork in the road.  I hope you are well and so happy you are still investing in students!”

The world is better because of the engagement of Samford faculty members in the intellectual development of their students.

Monday Mission, October 31, 2017

When history repeats itself, it isn’t always good, but this past weekend in Orlando, our Ethics Bowl team (Jordan Holland, Elizabeth Poulos, Stone Hendrickson, Caleb Punt and Bailey Bridgeman) secured Samford’s second Southeastern Regional Intercollegiate championship in a row, sharing the title with Rollins College.

We will advance to the national tournament in February. 

The world is better because of the ethical tenacity of our students.

Monday Mission, October 24, 2017

Jeanna and I attended a reception yesterday afternoon in honor of Ben and LuAnne Russell, recipients this year of the Alabama Humanities Award, presented by the Alabama Humanities Foundation.

Mr. and Mrs. Russell have been extraordinarily generous in supporting charitable work across our state, including Children’s Harbor, which offers significant services for children with serious illnesses and their families.  During the event, Dr. Myrle Grate introduced himself to us.  Dr. Grate is the Chief Executive Officer of Children’s Harbor, where he works each day to serve these families.  In introducing himself to us, he was quick to let us know that he is a Samford graduate.       

The world is better because of the faithful service of Dr. Myrle Grate and thousands of other Samford graduates.

 

Monday Mission, October 17, 2016

In the space below this message, you’ll read Samford’s official statements regarding the mission, core values and vision for the institution.

They’re great statements, but nowhere will you see the word “fun.”  Perhaps it is a word we ought to add.  Late on Saturday afternoon, after a rather comprehensive victory by our Bulldogs, Deion Pierre proposed marriage to his girlfriend, Jasmine Henderson, at Seibert Stadium.  The 2:09 video is pure fun.  Watch all the way to the end to hear Deion’s teammates chanting “She said yes!”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAIHvDKdYhE

The world is better because of Deion Pierre, Jasmine Henderson, and a host of guys who are destined for successful careers, but probably not as backup singers.

 

Monday Mission, October 3, 2016

Throughout Family Weekend, I was privileged to have hundreds of conversations, usually brief, with the parents of many of our current students.

 Two themes were prevalent throughout the majority of the comments that I received:  parents treasure the Christ-centered environment of the campus and they are grateful for the personal attention of the members of our faculty and staff in the development of their daughters and sons.  We are blessed to enjoy the widespread support of this vast array of friends.

The world is better because of the parents of our students.

Monday Mission, September 26, 2016

This morning Samford will receive the New Affiliate of the Year Award from The Washington Center at a luncheon at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Tom Woolley and I will be on hand to receive the award. The Washington Center now serves as home base for our students who wish to gain valuable experience in DC as they contemplate career options. Later today I'll visit with Austin Ferrer, a Samford senior, at his work assignment on Capitol Hill. If Austin chooses a career in DC, he will add his name to a long list of distinguished Samford graduates who are currently involved in providing service to the country and shaping public policy.

The world is better because of the influence of Samford graduates in places of power.

Monday Mission, September 19, 2016

Last Friday, in celebration of U. S. Constitution Day, our programs for University Fellows, Micah Fellows and Pre-Law, along with the Office of Diversity and Intercultural Initiatives, hosted an event for area high school students who were designated by their schools as “Constitution Day Fellows.”

They heard an address by Judge Stephen Dillard (a Samford alum) of the Court of Appeals of Georgia, participated in a discussion of The Federalist Papers, and learned about Lincoln’s famed “Cooper Union” speech.  Along the way, the students were exposed to Samford and to the opportunities that await them in the years ahead.   

The world is better because of Samford’s outreach to our community and because of the hope offered through the lives of these young men and women.

Monday Mission, September 12, 2016

Last Friday we observed—with a simple ceremony—the opening of the new buildings for the schools housed within our College of Health Sciences.

Brief remarks were presented, prayers and scripture offered and hymns sung.  As our A Cappella Choir sang, I was especially struck by these lyrics from a hymn, words which seem appropriate for each person within each of our disciplines: 

For those who need our work, God,
the ones that we’re called for.
We strive each day to serve them,
to give and love them more.
Vocation is for others,
lives given in exchange—
the good of all your children,
our common hopes and dreams.

The world is better because it is woven into the fabric of Samford that “vocation is for others.”

Monday Mission, August 29, 2016

According to the National Science Foundation, “the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) is the highest recognition that a kindergarten through 12th grade mathematics or science (including computer science) teacher may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States.”

Amanda Strickland Cavin, a graduate of Samford’s Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education, has recently been designated as a PAEMST honoree. 

Amanda is currently the assistant principal of two schools in Henry County, Georgia.  She began her career teaching third grade in the Clayton County School System, she spent the majority of her career teaching first grade, fifth grade, and pre-K students with special needs at Unity Grove Elementary School.  Her expertise in fostering a positive environment for teaching and learning is described on the PAEMST website:

As a teacher, Amanda engaged her students in project-based learning experiences, providing them the opportunity to apply their knowledge of mathematical concepts in a real-world context. She utilized technology to stimulate interest among her students and empower them to communicate mathematically.  Her students maintained personal blogs to share their ideas and mathematical connections to the real world, such as an analysis of weather data to inform decisions about the class garden.  These young mathematicians regularly played games to reinforce strategies for mathematics with students in other states via Skype and often connected with experts using the class Twitter account. These innovative teaching practices were recognized by the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement and Georgia Public Broadcasting.

The world is better because of Amanda Strickland Cavin (and Amanda’s dad, Dean Corky Strickland of our Cumberland School of Law, has known that the world is better because of Amanda since the moment of her birth).

Monday Mission, August 22, 2016

Jeanna and I know that the arrival of our entering freshmen can’t be far away because last night we hosted more than 100 “Connections” leaders at the house for dinner.

Later this week, these returning students will lead our 900 new undergraduates through their introduction to the campus, concluding with dinner and a concert on Sunday evening.

After dinner last night, the Connections leaders were given an opportunity to stand and talk about their memories of arriving at Samford as freshmen and their hopes for how they might welcome new students this week.  Among those who are now seniors, their positive, hopeful comments were laced with melancholy, as it has dawned on them that the experiences they have treasured here will soon give way to whatever lies ahead.  It is the ebb and flow of college life:  welcoming the new, preparing others to leave.  “To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven,” we read in Ecclesiastes, Chapter 3.  This is our season for welcoming, and I will cherish each moment.

The world is better because of new life for the Samford community.

 

 

Monday Mission, August 15, 2016

As I was watching the members of our football team in their scrimmage on Saturday morning, I remembered a voicemail message, received a few weeks ago by Martin Newton, our Athletics Director, which Martin forwarded to me.

As I was watching the members of our football team in their scrimmage on Saturday morning, I remembered a voicemail message, received a few weeks ago by Martin Newton, our Athletics Director, which Martin forwarded to me.  The message was from a local resident and a former collegiate athlete at another university, and he was calling to offer appreciation to Jake Kingree and Devlin Hodges, two Samford football players, for finding his wallet (with $200 to $300 in it), locating him on Facebook, and returning the lost item to him.  He praised Jake and Devlin for “their honesty and integrity,” closing the message by saying, “I’m a Samford fan now!”  Before playing their first game of the season, the members of our team are already winners.

The world is better because of Samford’s core values of “integrity, honesty, and justice,” as so often exemplified by our students.

 

Monday Mission, August 8, 2016

Perhaps the most industrious members of the Samford community spend all of their time outdoors.

Under the careful observation of Dr. Suresh Matthews, Chair of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics and his colleagues and students, our Samford Bees are making a positive difference in the world each day.  Their hives are located on a balcony outside our new facilities for the College of Health Sciences.   

The world is better bee-cause of the Samford Bees.

 

Monday Mission, August 1, 2016

Scott Fisk, an artist and chair of Samford’s Department of Art, and his wife, Timarie, an author, have found the time in recent months to create a children’s book with a very specific focus on Birmingham.

Scott Fisk, an artist and chair of Samford’s Department of Art, and his wife, Timarie, an author, have found the time in recent months to create a children’s book with a very specific focus on Birmingham.  Fuzzy Finny’s Adventures in the Magic City traces the journey of Fuzzy Finny throughout Birmingham, visiting many of our local landmarks.  I’ll admit that I have not read the book, but apparently Fuzzy Finny leads children toward a very tranquil sleep.  I may try to obtain a copy and ask Jeanna to read it to me tonight.

Incidentally, ten percent of the proceeds from the sale of the book will be used to provide scholarships for students in the arts in Alabama.

The world is better because of the creativity of Samford’s faculty members—and their creative spouses.

Monday Mission, June 20, 2016

A few minutes later they shared they had a desire to start a homeless ministry in downtown Birmingham and wanted to serve pancakes; and now they had the tools to get started.

During the week of final exams in May, a few of us volunteered one evening to cook pancakes for students during a study break in the University Center.  I can’t say that the pancakes were restaurant-quality, but the students were hungry, which mitigated the quality of the food.  The next day, Paige Acker, Director of Student Activities and Events, wrote to me to say that four students, Micah Green-Holloway, Alan Lane, Grant Landry, and Caylee Kennedy, stayed late to clean up the mess we had made in preparing the food.  In the process, through no fault of their own, a couple of the griddles were damaged.  Paige wrote:

The griddles were still working, but I had concerns about us using them for safety reasons. I offered them to the students and they were overjoyed. They said, "We have been praying for this!" Of course, I thought, "Well that's interesting, but okay." A few minutes later they shared they had a desire to start a homeless ministry in downtown Birmingham and wanted to serve pancakes; and now they had the tools to get started.  A few moments ago, they stopped by my office. They shared they got up around 5 a.m. today and made over 200 pancakes to take downtown. They were able to serve food, share the gospel, and donate the remaining food to a local church for their ministry. They then served coffee and sandwiches with the church members, praying with the people coming in for a free meal.

The world is better because Samford students reclaim broken griddles for great purposes.

Monday Mission, June 13, 2016

A month ago, during the commencement ceremony for our Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham attorney and Cumberland adjunct faculty member Terry McCarthy, selected as the commencement speaker, captivated the audience by reading from cards written by the new graduates when they were in one of his courses as first-year law students.

A month ago, during the commencement ceremony for our Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham attorney and Cumberland adjunct faculty member Terry McCarthy, selected as the commencement speaker, captivated the audience by reading from cards written by the new graduates when they were in one of his courses as first-year law students.  His humor, gently roasting the students as he read their comments (and adding a few of his own), demonstrated the ways in which our faculty members get to know their students.  The students loved it.  But the story gets better.  Alan Moore, one of our 2016 Cumberland graduates, wrote to me with this additional information a few days ago:

I don’t know if you’re aware, but Professor McCarthy kept those notecards he mentioned and hand wrote a personal note of congratulations to all the graduates, mentioning something we wrote on the notecards.  These appeared by surprise in our student mailboxes a couple of days before graduation.  I thought it was an incredibly kind and personal gesture.  Law schools have this reputation of being impersonal places where no one gets along, but at least at Cumberland, that’s just not the case.  The bottom line here is that one of Alabama’s busiest and most respected attorneys cared enough to personally congratulate every one of his graduating students (and I believe that’s most of our class). 

The world is better because Samford faculty members—full-time and part-time—invest themselves in the lives of their students.

Monday Mission, June 6, 2016

If they would, I’m sure there are many former students who could step forward and say, “Mr. Zeiger made it possible for me to go to Howard and/or Samford.”

A few days ago Mrs. Gene Zeiger, widow of Mr. Evan Zeiger, passed away. Her husband was, for many years, the business manager of first, Howard College, and then Samford University. He was a legendary figure during difficult economic times, squeezing every penny so that Samford could meet obligations. I was unable to attend Mrs. Zeiger’s funeral service, but I received a copy of a letter that she wrote to her children on June 15, 1991, their 45th wedding anniversary. In the letter, she sought to communicate to members of her family the joy that they found in serving God through their Samford association. Among the many poignant passages is this one:

Many times the phone would ring and it would be your dad calling to ask me if we had any money in the bank. He would say he had a student that didn’t have the money for his tuition, so we came to his rescue. If they would, I’m sure there are many former students who could step forward and say, “Mr. Zeiger made it possible for me to go to Howard and/or Samford.”

The world is better because of the legacy of support for Samford from friends like Evan and Gene Zeiger.

Monday Mission, May 23, 2016

Our student teachers from the Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education receive tremendous benefits from their experiences in the schools, but I’m frequently reminded that they often give as much as they receive.

Our student teachers from the Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education receive tremendous benefits from their experiences in the schools, but I’m frequently reminded that they often give as much as they receive.  Susan Galloway, ESL teacher at Vestavia Hills Elementary Cahaba Heights, sent this message two weeks ago to Dean Jeanie Box: 

I want to write you to compliment you on all the wonderful student teachers that you all have sent to Cahaba Heights from Samford.  Margaret Ann Walker and Brandy Travis have truly been exceptional teachers and I just wanted you to know how impressed that we have all been with both of them. They are just so professional and so passionate about helping the students. You all should be so proud of them as they are excellent teachers and they are wonderful representatives of Samford University. They just really have that "wow" factor and we are going to miss them so much!

The world is better because Samford education graduates are professional and passionate.

Monday Mission, May 9, 2016

Mike and Mary Anne Freeman, generous sponsors of many of our programs in the School of the Arts, wrote last week to express their appreciation for one of our students from the Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing.

Mike and Mary Anne were leaving an event downtown when they witnessed the competence and compassion of Jessica Chapman.  Here’s Mike’s account:

Following the performance, one of the older audience members, who is of an age where she is now mobility challenged and forced to walk with a cane, was leaving the Alys Stephens Center when she slipped and fell onto a concrete walkway while attempting to negotiate a doorway to the parking lot. She was badly bruised, was bleeding profusely and, quite frankly, appeared somewhat scared by this turn of events.

Jessica was nearby at the time and immediately rendered assistance to this woman even though the friends she was with were ready to leave. She made the accident victim comfortable, checked her condition, worked to staunch the bleeding -- and most importantly, stayed with the injured woman and kept her calm until the Birmingham paramedics arrived to transport her to the ER.

We're very thankful that Jessica was present to make effective use of the skills she's learned during her time at Samford, and that she was willing to make assisting others in need a priority over enjoying her own evening out on the town with her friends.

In response to the nice message from Mike and Mary Anne, Jessica had this to say:

When I saw the elderly woman so afraid and in need of medical attention, my heart went out to her and I wanted to do all in my power to assist her.  The IVMSON teaches us how to provide care compassionately, empathetically, and courageously.  Those skills came to my aid when comforting this woman.  Even though I could not mend her physical bruising and bleeding, I was able to provide comfort and keep her stable until help arrived.  Thanks to my education at the IVMSON, this set of skills came naturally to me when the time arose.

The world is better because of Jessica Chapman and the education she has received through the Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing and Samford University.

Monday Mission, May 2, 2016

We heard a few days ago from Dr. Joe Creech, Director of the Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts that our own Sam Hahn, Samford Class of ’16, has been named a member of the ninth cohort of Lilly Fellows, a distinguished program for graduate students.

We heard a few days ago from Dr. Joe Creech, Director of the Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts that our own Sam Hahn, Samford Class of ’16, has been named a member of the ninth cohort of Lilly Fellows, a distinguished program for graduate students.  He follows Nathan Smolin, named last year to the eighth cohort.  Dr. Joel Davis of our School of the Arts was our first Lilly Fellow, several years ago.  Sam follows within a long Samford tradition of producing graduates with a unique blend of heart, soul, and mind.  

 The world is better because of Sam Hahn and the members of the Samford faculty who helped to nurture his soul and sharpen his mind.

Monday Mission, April 27, 2015

Every employee at Samford is in a position to lend support to our academic program.

Every employee at Samford is in a position to lend support to our academic program.  In fact, that’s why we’re all here.  Last week I received this vignette from Dr. Kristie Chandler, Chair of Human Development and Family Science, reminding me of the important interaction between our students and the valued members of our staff:

As I was working in my office with the door closed (trying to grade…ugh!), I overheard one of our students who dropped by to speak with Susan Kalinich, our departmental  Administrative Assistant.  With great excitement, the student said, “Ms. Susan, I just ran my t-test for my senior research project, and my finding was significant!”  I am grateful to work in a place where administrative assistants are partners in the educational process of our students.

The world is better because of the attention our students receive from members of the Samford staff.

Monday Mission, April 25, 2016

Earlier this month, students from our Department of Journalism and Mass Communication in the Howard College of Arts and Sciences competed in the Bateman Case Study Competition, sponsored each year by the Public Relations Student Society of America.

Earlier this month, students from our Department of Journalism and Mass Communication in the Howard College of Arts and Sciences competed in the Bateman Case Study Competition, sponsored each year by the Public Relations Student Society of America.  The competition is among the most prestigious collegiate public relations programs in the nation, with 70 entries this year.  Sixteen entries received honorable mention, but only three of the teams were invited as finalists.  Our team from Samford, advised by Dr. Betsy Emmons, will travel to Chicago next month to join their peers from Loyola University of New Orleans and the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa to compete for the top prize.  Congratulations to Dr. Emmons and her great team, comprised of Emily Duval, Allie Haywood, Lauren Hutchens, Kathleen Sharp, and Paige Shelby.   

The world is better because of the creativity and persistence of Samford people.

 

Monday Mission, April 18, 2016

Last Saturday morning, 824 students (and a few eager Samford employees) climbed out of bed early to gather at Seibert Stadium before departing throughout Birmingham for "Samford Gives Back," sponsored by our Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership.

Last Saturday morning, 824 students (and a few eager Samford employees) climbed out of bed early to gather at Seibert Stadium before departing throughout Birmingham for "Samford Gives Back," sponsored by our Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership. Working with 33 charities, they gave almost 3,300 hours in service.  As icing on the cake, a group of Samford alums joined the effort.  The day was a living example of the challenge of Christ to love our neighbors.

The world is better because Samford people understanding that life is empty without serving others.

Monday Mission, April 11, 2016

Institutional cultures don’t develop overnight.

Institutional cultures don’t develop overnight.  They’re formed over the process of many years; in Samford’s case, almost 175 years.  Visitors to our campus often speak of their first impressions, and invariably they mention the kindness of the people they encounter.  (Yes, they also mention the green grass as they drive through the main gate.)  Dr. Jill Cunningham of our Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing forwarded to me a message that she received from a campus guest who caught us on a very good day:  “Samford really is unique.  From the staff at Einstein’s Bagels, to the groundskeeper I asked directions from, to the staff I spoke with in the graduate program, everyone was so helpful and friendly—just the ‘personal touch’ I am looking for.”

The world is better because kindness is cherished at Samford. 

Monday Mission, April 4, 2016

Gina Locklear earned her degree in business management from Samford in 2001. Featured last week in a major story in The New York Times, the article’s headline proclaimed her as the “sock queen of Alabama.”

Gina didn’t become Alabama’s sock queen overnight.  In fact, she inherited the interest from her parents in Fort Payne and has helped to keep alive the struggling sock manufacturing industry in that town, securing employment for people along the way.  Her goal for the two lines of her business—Zkano and Little River—is to “make a sustainable sock” by exercising great care in the selection of materials.  According to the article, “Gina handles it herself—in addition to ordering yarn, designing both lines, doing social media marketing, processing credit card orders and lying awake nights with worry.”     

Sock it to ‘em, Gina.  The world is better because of you.

Perhaps you already know that the Republic of Mauritius is an island nation, located east of the southern portion of the continent of Africa.

Monday Mission, March 28, 2016

Four Samford students now know considerably more about Mauritius than the nation’s location, as they represented the country last week at the 2016 Model United Nations in New York.  Among the 5,000 students from 400 colleges and universities, the Samford delegation (Juliana Guzman, Marley Davis, Emily Praktish and Ella Oxley, along with advisor Dr. Serena Simoni) was awarded Honorable Mention status.  Following the conference, Marley Davis gave her own assessment of the most significant part of the experience:  “While we had time to explore New York City, what was more memorable was the connections we made with other national and international students.”    

 The world is better because of Samford’s engagement in understanding people from all nations.

 

Monday Mission, March 7, 2016

I'm sure you are aware that Samford's Core Text Program is comprised of two courses, Cultural Perspective 101 and 102, in which, according to our website's description of the program, students "are taught to read, think, and communicate by interacting with classic texts that have stood the test of time."

Directed by Dr. Jason Wallace, the program also features a two-week study/travel component in London, available each summer to a small group of rising sophomores.  These immersion experiences have been well received by the participants.  In fact, one of the students to participate in the first summer program in 2014 (in her first trip outside the United States) recently voiced this endorsement:

      "The trip gave me the ability to travel out of my comfort zone.  I am now going back to England for a third time this summer.  I went last summer and worked alongside a church planter.  We worked in a local school and it was wonderful to build relationships with the students.  I made lasting relationships last summer with the people I came in contact with.  This upcoming trip will be more meaningful due to the fact that I get to see my friends again."

The world is better because of lessons learned and experiences gained through the Core Text Program.

Monday Mission, February 29, 2016

LTC Jeff Damron, a Samford graduate from the Class of 1975, sent me this message last week:

Last Saturday, I took three of our cadets from Lyman Ward Military Academy, a boarding school in Camp Hill, Alabama, where I serve as Academic Dean, to the Samford vs. VMI basketball game.  As a 1975 Samford graduate, I was anxious to show them my alma mater.  We decided to tour the campus after the game, and we met two of your freshmen—Summer Bennison and Jack Biedermann. 

Summer and Jack invited us to eat with them in the Cafeteria, which we did, and to take us on a walking tour.  I was anxious to see the new Business Building (it has the "wow" factor), and we made the loop around the Quad.  My three cadets were enthralled by the whole experience, and one of them, who is a junior, plans to apply to Samford.   He is interested in journalism, which happens to be the major for both Summer and Jack.

Bottom line:  Two Samford freshmen took time out of their schedule on a late Saturday afternoon to show hospitality to four visitors.  They made an indelibly positive impression on me, and especially on my three students.

The Admissions Office should hire Summer and Jack for internships.  (And the world is better because of Summer and Jack!)

The world is better because Samford people, including Summer and Jack, put aside their own priorities to look out for the needs of those around them.

Monday Mission, February 22, 2016

It is an ordinary Monday morning in February, a bit dreary in Birmingham due to the rain that we’ll be receiving throughout the day.

It is an ordinary Monday morning in February, a bit dreary in Birmingham due to the rain that we’ll be receiving throughout the day.  But extraordinary things are about to happen at Samford.  Faculty and students are preparing for classes and, throughout the day, there will be bursts of understanding, laughs about shared experiences, and the satisfaction that comes when we know that we are where we are supposed to be, doing what we are supposed to do.

 The world is better because extraordinary things happen at Samford, even on ordinary days.

Monday Mission, February 8, 2016

Having spent eight days in Washington, DC since the end of January, I was glad to return home on Thursday evening.

Having spent eight days in Washington, DC since the end of January, I was glad to return home on Thursday evening.  My visit to Washington included several meetings with elected officials and staff members.  Late in the day last Tuesday, I spent about 30 minutes with Mary Blanche Hankey, a graduate of our Cumberland School of Law and the Legislative Counsel for Senator Jeff Sessions. At the end of a very long day for her, Mary Blanche listened patiently to me as I tried to explain many of the public policy interests for those of us in independent higher education.  Her competence and compassion are hallmarks of Cumberland lawyers.

 The world is better because of Mary Blanche Hankey and the dozens of Samford graduates serving on Capitol Hill.

Monday Mission, February 1

Cindy Ritter, our Coordinator of Undergraduate Student Services in the Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing, lost her mom last month.
Sticky-Note-Sympathy-Message.jpg

She was comforted by wonderful memories and many expressions of support from colleagues and friends.  But perhaps the most poignant reminder of support came from this simple post-it note left on her desk by the housekeeping staff in her building.

The world is better because, at Samford, we share a sense of calling to our work, regardless of our responsibilities.

Monday Mission, 1/25/2016

This past weekend Clayton McWhorter, pioneer in the delivery of health care and a visionary leader, slipped from this world to his eternal home. In lending his name to our own McWhorter School of Pharmacy and in giving of his resources to support our people and programs, his legacy will endure at Samford for generations to come.

This past weekend Clayton McWhorter, pioneer in the delivery of health care and a visionary leader, slipped from this world to his eternal home.  In lending his name to our own McWhorter School of Pharmacy and in giving of his resources to support our people and programs, his legacy will endure at Samford for generations to come.  Clayton was bright, friendly, considerate, and inquisitive, always searching for solutions to problems.  Many of us at Samford are honored to have known him as a trusted friend.   

 The world is better because of Clayton McWhorter.

 

Monday Mission, January 4

As is the case with most universities in the United States, Samford is dependent on the gifts of alumni and friends for the support of our people and programs, but the stories of those gifts too often fade into the background.

As is the case with most universities in the United States, Samford is dependent on the gifts of alumni and friends for the support of our people and programs, but the stories of those gifts too often fade into the background.  Among Samford’s many friends are Sue and Lon Vance, retired school teachers from Eutaw, Alabama. Their daughter, Katherine Victoria, known as Kavi to family and friends, earned a pharmacy degree from Samford in 1998. Their son, Dean, graduated from Samford in 1995. In September of 1999, the Vance family lost Kavi in a tragic car accident. A few months after the loss, Sue and Lon, joined by those who love them, began to make gifts to Samford to establish a scholarship in Kavi’s memory. Each December, Sue and Lon place luminaries in the cemetery at Eutaw in memory of the “saints gone before,” and each year since 1999 more than 100 of their friends have made gifts to Kavi’s fund, which now exceeds $160,000. Kavi’s legacy is alive in the dozens of pharmacy students who have benefited from these precious scholarships. 


The world is better because of Kavi Vance, her family and friends.

Monday Mission, December 21

Later this week, Mr. Beeson (and his statuary friends) will be virtually alone on the campus as our official Christmas holidays get underway.
I’m thinking today especially of those loyal staff members who will watch over the campus during the holidays, keeping the buildings safe, checking for leaking pipes, making sure that the website remains active, and engaging in the host of activities that require the presence and attention of human beings.  Thank you, friends, for the sacrifice that you will make.
The world is better because of the faithfulness of the Samford staff.
I added a slider at the top that includes a link to Dr. Donaldson’s intro video and a link to the most recent Transhumanism Conference. Additional slides are easy to add, and these slides are easy to update.

Monday Mission, December 14, 2015

As I left my office in Samford Hall on Saturday morning to walk to the Hanna Center for our December commencement ceremony, I noticed seven or eight people gathered near the Christmas tree on Centennial Walk, one of them in cap and gown.

As I left my office in Samford Hall on Saturday morning to walk to the Hanna Center for our December commencement ceremony, I noticed seven or eight people gathered near the Christmas tree on Centennial Walk, one of them in cap and gown.  I assumed that they were trying to get ahead of the rush on a busy day in what has become the iconic Samford location for photographs.  A few seconds later, I looked again.  They had formed a circle and their heads were bowed in prayer.  My heart was gripped as I was reminded of the sacrifices that families have made, the prayers offered, the joys shared, the adversities overcome, the lessons learned, the friendships built, the knowledge gained, the wisdom pursued, the doors opened . . . all within the pathway of a Samford degree.     

The world is better because of the heartfelt prayers of Samford people.

Monday Mission, 11/30/2015

Perhaps you saw the news a few days ago that Dr. Brad Busbee, chair of our Department of English, received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Southeastern Medieval Association at the organization’s fall meeting in Little Rock.

Perhaps you saw the news a few days ago that Dr. Brad Busbee, chair of our Department of English, received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Southeastern Medieval Association at the organization’s fall meeting in Little Rock.  In addition to his record as a classroom teacher, bringing medieval literature to life for his students, Brad’s scholarship extends to many published works and to serving as co-editor of the Grundtvig Studier:  An International Journal for the Study of Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig.  He will serve as host for Anders Holm, his colleague from Denmark, as a visiting Fulbright scholar at Samford next spring.   

The world is better because of the teaching, service, and scholarship of Brad Busbee.

 

Monday Mission, November 23, 2015

Who says that Samford isn’t bowl eligible?

Who says that Samford isn’t bowl eligible?  Not the judges for the Southeastern Ethics Bowl championship, held earlier this month in St. Petersburg, Florida.  The Bulldogs defeated the Midshipmen of the U. S. Naval Academy in the championship match.  They’ll move on to the national championship round, scheduled for February in Reston, Virginia.  Led by team captain Caleb Punt (given the abundance of football clichés in this piece, I’ll resist the temptation to offer additional commentary on Caleb’s last name), the Samford squad includes Bailey Bridgeman, Stone Hendrickson, Jordan Holland, Laura Ann Prickett and Elizabeth Poulos.  They are coached by two all-stars, Wilton Bunch and Michael Janas.  To read additional details, go to http://www.samford.edu/news/2015/11/Samford-Ethics-Bowl-Team-Wins-Regional-Title.

The world is better because of Samford’s game-winning students and coaches (in athletics and in other significant areas of campus life).

Monday Mission, November 9, 2015

On Saturday evening our Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education celebrated 100 years of teacher education by presenting “Learning for Life Awards” to more than 100 distinguished graduates.

On Saturday evening our Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education celebrated 100 years of teacher education by presenting “Learning for Life Awards” to more than 100 distinguished graduates.  Ninety-eight of the recipients, or members of their families, were present to accept the awards.  Their professional pursuits are varied:  teachers at all levels in all aspects of education; principals; superintendents; ministers; missionaries; musicians; business owners; health professionals; homemakers; and authors.  They represent the thousands of graduates who have brought knowledge and hope to millions of people throughout the past century.

The world is better because of the Orlean Bullard Beeson School of Education.

Monday Mission, November 30, 2015

Perhaps you saw the news a few days ago that Dr. Brad Busbee, chair of our Department of English, received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Southeastern Medieval Association at the organization’s fall meeting in Little Rock.

In addition to his record as a classroom teacher, bringing medieval literature to life for his students, Brad’s scholarship extends to many published works and to serving as co-editor of the Grundtvig Studier: An International Journal for the Study of Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig. He will serve as host for Anders Holm, his colleague from Denmark, as a visiting Fulbright scholar at Samford next spring.

The world is better because of the teaching, service, and scholarship of Brad Busbee.

Monday Mission, November 2, 2015

This past Saturday I asked our students to mention the person at Samford who had most influenced their lives. Without a second’s hesitation, the four students named four Samford employees: Bernie Ankney, Charlotte Brammer, Matt Kerlin, and Eric Mathis.

When we host prospective students and their families for Preview Days and I’m given an opportunity to welcome the group, I often invite—without any advance warning—three or four of our current students to the stage so that I can ask them questions about their Samford experience. The spontaneity at least holds the attention of the early-morning audience. This past Saturday I asked our students to mention the person at Samford who had most influenced their lives. Without a second’s hesitation, the four students named four Samford employees: Bernie Ankney, Charlotte Brammer, Matt Kerlin, and Eric Mathis. In each case, the students mentioned the amount of time and wisdom that these men and women had poured into their lives.

The world is better because the members of the Samford faculty and staff always make time for their students.

Monday Mission, October 26

It has become commonplace: another regular season SoCon championship for Samford soccer. The win came Friday evening at East Tennessee State University, with a final score of 1-0. But there has been nothing common about this season.

It has become commonplace:  another regular season SoCon championship for Samford soccer.  The win came Friday evening at East Tennessee State University, with a final score of 1-0.  But there has been nothing common about this season.  Throughout each day this fall, and stretching back several years, Coach Todd Yelton and his wife, Shauna, and their family and friends have been battling Shauna’s cancer.  During her time as the director of our campus health center, Shauna provided much-needed care to hundreds of our students and employees.  Now it is our turn to care for her.  

In an exchange with Todd early Saturday morning, he wrote these words to me:   “This has been a tough journey.  However, the Almighty continues to show up in our desperation.  We often speak of family.  It has become a cliché in sports.  However, this team, the athletic department and the Samford community have demonstrated that we really do love one another.  I am humbled by the love that our team and their families have demonstrated to us.  We often speak of how much we love and care for one another.  To this group it's much more than a cliché as they demonstrate that daily.  I am moved beyond being able to express how proud I am of this group.”    

The world is better because of Shauna and Todd Yelton.

Monday Mission, October 19, 2015

At the most recent Annual Conference on Teaching, five of the 27 research papers selected for presentation were from Samford students.

According to Dr. Stephen Chew, chair of our Department of Psychology, the Annual Conference on Teaching (ACT) is the main conference for the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. At the most recent conference, five of the 27 research papers selected for presentation were from Samford students. The strong record of acceptance is a testimonial to the scholarship of the students and to Dr. Chew’s attention to their work. Congratulations to Joshua Aarons, Kevin Figlewicz, Keke Fletcher, Sarah Pryor, Will Brennan, Ashley Ferguson, Parisa Poorak, Sarah Tarnakow, Jeremy Dale, Ashlyn Ward, Rebecca Womack, Sara Nolin, Mikala Pickens, Katherine M. Wood, and Ellen Pacsi.

The world is better because of Samford’s environment for teaching, learning, and research.

MONDAY MISSION, OCTOBER 5, 2015

According to Dr. Kristie Chandler, department chair, a Samford graduate has received this national award four years in a row.

Hannah Newman, one of our 2015 graduates from the Department of Human Development and Family Science, was notified a few days ago that her paper, “The Relationship Between Parental Conflict Tactics and Sibling Contact Tactics,” received the Outstanding Undergraduate Research Paper Award from the National Council on Family Relations Affiliate Council, a noteworthy accomplishment.  According to Dr. Kristie Chandler, department chair, a Samford graduate has received this national award four years in a row.

The world is better because Samford students and faculty are committed to high standards of scholarship.

Monday Mission, September 28, 2015

Two people associated with Samford received significant international honors this month.

Heather West, director of our Critical Languages Program, was named a Knight of the Order of Academic Palms by the government of France in recognition of her record of service to French education. She founded the Samford in France program in 1996 and is currently serving as the executive director of the Alabama World Languages Association.

Elmer Harris, a Samford trustee and former President and CEO of Alabama Power, was recognized by the government of Japan with the presentation of the Order of the Rising Sun. Mr. Harris served for a decade as Honorary Consul General of Japan, promoting closer ties between Alabama and Japan.

The world is better because of the international engagement of Samford’s faculty, students, alumni, and friends.

Monday Mission, September 21, 2015

The world is better because of the Samford faculty...and because of the support of Samford parents for the educational experiences of their students.

Among the many great elements of Susan Doyle’s planning for Family Weekend was her inclusion of classes for parents, taught on Friday afternoon by several members of our faculty.  Topics ranged from “the reliability of eyewitness testimony” to “how Plato can save your life,” with “betterocracy” thrown in for good measure.  The brief sessions highlighted for parents the ways in which our faculty members regularly engage students in courses across all disciplines.  I heard many positive remarks about the classes on Friday and Saturday, usually with this parting comment:  “we wish that we were enrolled at Samford!”

The world is better because of the Samford faculty...and because of the support of Samford parents for the educational experiences of their students.

Monday Mission. August 31, 2015

This morning I’m conscious of the fact that we have not one story, but 5,206 stories at Samford.

This morning I’m conscious of the fact that we have not one story, but 5,206 stories at Samford.  That is our final fall enrollment number:  5,206.  They come to us from 46 states and 32 other countries, each student bringing with them all of the characteristics and influences that have shaped their lives.  Each with a mind, a heart, a soul.  Will we nurture them, as our mission calls us to do, in the “development of intellect, creativity, faith, and personhood”?  The challenge of meeting that standard inspires us each day.

The world is better because of the presence of 5,206 lives among us this fall at Samford University. 

Monday Mission, August 24, 2015

We are blessed this year, as always, with a remarkable freshman class.

We are blessed this year, as always, with a remarkable freshman class.  One of our entering students, Beth Birchfield of Montgomery, brings with her a zeal for helping the people of Haiti.  In her short life, she has already made 18 trips there.  Commenting on her most recent visit to Haiti, Beth wrote a few days ago, “I learned to love big because our God is big.”    

The world is better because of Beth Birchfield.

Monday Mission, August 17, 2015

One of our students, Rachel Fox, served as an intern this summer in Rwanda.

One of our students, Rachel Fox, served as an intern this summer in Rwanda.  A friend shared a summary of Rachel’s experiences with me.  Of the many poignant stories that she related, this one caught my attention:  

I remember an instance that was especially eye-opening for me when my boss and I showed up unannounced to have a meeting with a hotel manager. When we entered, the place reminded me of a Western hotel. After waiting a while to have a meeting with the manager and having a hurried few minutes of conversation with her, my boss and I left. I felt that we had a fruitful meeting because we accomplished the goal of our visit, but as we were walking out, my boss whispered to me, “I hate coming to this place because they never have time for people.” While I was pleased with the efficiency of our meeting, my boss was frustrated at the rushed nature of our time there.

On this first day of classes for the new academic year, I hope that we will remember a lesson from Rachel’s new friend in Rwanda:  may we always have time for people.

The world is better because Samford helps students to learn from people around the globe.

 

Monday Mission, August 10, 2015

As the members of our faculty and staff in the Brock School of Business will attest, we’ve begun to take complete occupancy of their new home.

As the members of our faculty and staff in the Brock School of Business will attest, we’ve begun to take complete occupancy of their new home.  Even as we prepare for classes to begin in the new facility next week, this message from Dr. Lowell Broom of our accounting faculty is a reminder that, despite the beauty of the new building, it is what happens inside the building that counts:

I have just been notified by the Executive Director of the Alabama State Board of Public Accountancy that for at least the past year, Samford University graduates had the highest first time pass rate on the CPA Exam of any university in the State of Alabama. That is, of candidates sitting for a given part of the CPA Exam (there are four separate parts) for the first time, Samford students passed that part on their first attempt at a higher rate than any other university’s graduates in the State of Alabama. That passing rate also far exceeds the national average. 

The world is better because of the teaching and learning environment at Samford.

Monday Mission, August 3, 2015

We all know the frustration of a bag that rips open in the parking lot, our purchases tumbling in all directions.

We all know the frustration of a bag that rips open in the parking lot, our purchases tumbling in all directions.  A few weeks ago—in the early evening—I was walking across campus when I heard the sound of cans and bottles crashing upon concrete.  I turned to locate the noise and I saw one of our custodians already bent over a burst garbage bag, grabbing items that were beginning to roll down the hill.  Just as quickly, I glanced around to see one of our students, out for a walk, ever-present earbuds in place, suddenly running to assist the custodian.  I watched for a few seconds as he collected garbage and she thanked him for his help.   It was the spontaneity of the young man that captured my attention.  His action were prompted by first instincts.  Does Samford have a lock on that kind of helpfulness?  Hardly.  But the “first instinct” response of our people is a joy to see.

The world is better because of the healthy, meaningful interaction that takes place at Samford every day.

 

Monday Mission, July 27, 2015

How College Works is a book written a couple of years ago by Dan Chambliss and Christopher Takacs.

How College Works is a book written a couple of years ago by Dan Chambliss and Christopher Takacs.  Chambliss is a long-time faculty member at Hamilton College in New York, where he has studied the factors that contribute to the success of college students.  A very simple summary of the book is that a great college experience is built on relationships with two or three friends and meaningful encounters with one or two faculty members.  Everything else pales by comparison.  On the basis of hundreds of conversations with our alums, my guess is that this thesis is correct, at least as far as Samford is concerned.  For all the efforts throughout higher education today to provide every possible environmental factor to improve college life, key relationships will always have the greatest influence.        

The world is better because relationships are cherished at Samford.

 

Monday Mission, July 20, 2015

In less than one month we will welcome the largest number of entering undergraduates in our history, more than 800 freshmen according to our latest projections.

In less than one month we will welcome the largest number of entering undergraduates in our history, more than 800 freshmen according to our latest projections.  Hundreds of employees and thousands of friends have helped to recruit this class, but our staff in the admissions office, led by the indomitable Jason Black, deserve the greatest round of applause for their efforts.  Thank you, admissions staffers, for your extraordinary service.   

The world is better because of the 800 freshmen headed our way . . . and the men and women who recruited them.

 

Monday Mission, July 6, 2015

Dr. Michael Hardin began a new chapter in his life last week as our Provost, completing his tenure as the Dean of the Culverhouse School of Business at the University of Alabama.

Dr. Michael Hardin began a new chapter in his life last week as our Provost, completing his tenure as the Dean of the Culverhouse School of Business at the University of Alabama.  He arrives with the good will of the entire campus (and the relief of the 19-member search committee).  Mike’s wife is Anna Kathryn.  As I received the committee’s recommendation that we ask Dr. Hardin to accept the position, I talked with perhaps as many as 30 people who had known him in various capacities, both personal and professional.  If I had to offer one summary of the conversations, it would be this:  “He’s one of the finest people I have ever known.”  Welcome to Samford, Mike and Anna Kathryn, where you’ll write your own Samford stories.   

The world is better because of Mike and Anna Kathryn Hardin.  (You may write a word of welcome to Dr. Hardin at mhardin@samford.edu.)

 

Monday Mission, June 22, 2015

Although God did not call me to preach, as the president of Samford I have more than my share of opportunities to stand in pulpits on Sunday mornings, preventing—as I often say—the congregation from hearing a good sermon.

Although God did not call me to preach, as the president of Samford I have more than my share of opportunities to stand in pulpits on Sunday mornings, preventing—as I often say—the congregation from hearing a good sermon.  Yesterday I had the privilege of speaking in the 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. services at the First Baptist Church of Tuscaloosa, where Samford connections abound.  Prior to the first service, I met a lovely, soft-spoken lady who informed me—with appropriate pride—that Sonya Davis is her daughter.  Sonya is an instructor in the Core Curriculum at Samford, where she keeps alive (or kindles, if necessary) the love of learning in our students.  Sonya’s mom and I stood in the aisle of the church yesterday morning, giving thanks for her work and the fact that she is at Samford.  The setting of the exchange reminded me of the sacred calling that we have, even if we’re not called to preach.      

The world is better because of Sonya Davis (and her very nice mother).

Monday Mission, June 15, 2015

Almost every summer, I pass along a few lines in a “Monday Mission” from James Strange, Associate Professor of Religion in our Howard College of Arts and Sciences, as he continues his archeological work in Israel.

Almost every summer, I pass along a few lines in a “Monday Mission” from James Strange, Associate Professor of Religion in our Howard College of Arts and Sciences, as he continues his archeological work in Israel.  In an update I received from James this weekend, he commented on the fact that he is ending the last week of the dig.  This morning I offer to you his poignant closing lines:      

We are visitors here, no matter how at home we feel.  And when we leave, the banality, joys, and heartbreaks of everyday life will continue.  People will have to negotiate how to live with people they merely tolerate, or despise.  The issue of violence and how to resolve the Palestinian problem will persist.  All of this will require efforts of genuine goodwill, because we know what hatred will do if unchecked by our God-given knowledge of what is right.  Pray for peace in Israel.

The world is better because of the mind, soul, and hands of James Strange.

 

Monday Mission, June 8, 2015

We’re hosting another wave of new students and family members this morning for orientation.

We’re hosting another wave of new students and family members this morning for orientation.  In a few minutes I’ll have the honor of speaking to them in the Wright Center, welcoming them to the next chapter of their lives.  In my years at Samford, as I’ve asked hundreds—perhaps thousands—of students why they were drawn to this place, perhaps the most common reply is that “it felt right to me.”  That’s shorthand, I think, for reasons that are probably too numerous to mention, but it is impossible for most of us to separate a “right feeling” about a place from the people we encounter there.  Samford feels right for so many students and families because of the quality of our people.  

The world is better because of the people—students, alumni, friends, and employees—of Samford.

 

Monday Mission, June 1, 2015

A few days after commencement weekend I received a letter from the father of two Samford graduates.

A few days after commencement weekend I received a letter from the father of two Samford graduates.  One of the students graduated this May.  Pleased with the experiences of his students, he chose—through the lens of a parent—to provide five answers to the question, “Why Samford?”  Here they are:

 

  1. So many classes are taught by full professors.
  2. Tremendous opportunities for international studies.
  3. “No co-ed dorms.”
  4. The requirement of a senior thesis.
  5. “Most importantly, Samford has maintained a biblical world view in an intellectually rigorous environment.” 

 

This dad also took the time to highlight a few of the people who contributed to the success of his Samford graduates:  Larry Davenport, Dave and Robin Johnson, and Julie Steward. 

The world is better, according to this thoughtful father, because of at least five reasons, all of them found at Samford.

 

 

Monday Mission, May 11, 2015

Among our graduating seniors this weekend will be Adam Quinn.

Among our graduating seniors this weekend will be Adam Quinn.  Adam’s honors while at Samford are too numerous to recite in this short message, but one quick illustration will put his work in context.  A few weeks ago I received this message from Dr. Jane Hiles of our Department of English:

I'm happy to announce that senior English major Adam Quinn has been awarded first prize for the best paper submitted to the Sigma Tau Delta International Honor Society's annual convention in British/International literature. Adam presented his paper, titled "Joyce's Portrait: Education and Colonial Status," at the Sigma Tau Delta convention in Albuquerque, NM, last Saturday. He was accompanied by two other presenters from Samford's English department: senior Megan Burr and junior Sarah Sullivan. Adam will receive a first place award of $600. After his presentation, the colleague chairing the session remarked that Adam's was a graduate-level paper, and he exclaimed, "I want some of your students before I retire!"  Adam has represented the English department, the Fellows program and Samford University very well. I'm proud of his work and of the work Samford faculty have done with him.

Adam has earned an Academic Fulbright Award and will study at University College Dublin this fall.

The world is better because of Adam Quinn.

 

Monday Mission, May 4, 2015

Just last night, Matt Kerlin, Assistant Dean for Spiritual Life, sent this message to me:

Just last night, Matt Kerlin, Assistant Dean for Spiritual Life, sent this message to me:

Sunday afternoon I was able to see the final performance of Samford theatre’s production of Jane Eyre, a musical adaptation of the novel by Charlotte Brontë.  The talent on display was truly astounding and brought the story to life with emotion and creativity.  In particular, senior musical theatre major Carin Lagerberg performed stunningly as the main character.  In the post-production Q & A with the cast and crew, a student asked Carin which of the musical’s themes most resonated with her.  Carin spoke of how the story highlights the social pressure placed on women to live up to artificial standards of beauty, and she reminded all of us in the audience that God’s compassionate view of us should take precedence over how others may judge us.  As the father of two daughters, I thought her response was both memorable and wise.

Matt concluded his message with these words:  “In my ninth year at Samford, I continue to be moved by all that is good about this place.”

The world is better because Samford nurtures persons in their development of intellect, creativity, faith, and personhood.

 

Monday Mission, April 20, 2015

Throughout this week and extending into the early portion of next week, many of us on the campus will be engaged in interviews with three candidates for the position of Provost.

Throughout this week and extending into the early portion of next week, many of us on the campus will be engaged in interviews with three candidates for the position of Provost.  The interviews are taking place, of course, because our current Provost, Dr. Brad Creed, has accepted the presidency of Campbell University in North Carolina.  Dr. and Mrs. Creed and their family are cherished members of this community.  Today, April 20, happens to be Dr. Creed’s birthday.  Join me, if you will, in flooding his inbox with birthday greetings and best wishes for his important work at Campbell.  His e-mail address is jbcreed@samford.edu.  

The world is better because of Dr. Creed’s presence at Samford.

 

 

 

Monday Mission, April 13, 2015

Following is the text of a message I received on Saturday from Dr. Bryan Johnson, Director of our University Fellows program, writing from Tallahassee where university students from Birmingham had a very successful weekend:

Following is the text of a message I received on Saturday from Dr. Bryan Johnson, Director of our University Fellows program, writing from Tallahassee where university students from Birmingham had a very successful weekend:

Our University Fellows Ethics Bowl team just finished as runners-up to UAB at the National Bioethics Bowl Tournament.  In their first bioethics competition, Bailey Bridgeman, Stone Hendrickson, Jordan Holland, Laura Ann Prickett, and Caleb Punt won five matches in a row to make it into the championship match.  They defeated Illinois Tech, Doral College, DePauw University, Dartmouth, and Florida State.  In the championship match, they tied an all senior UAB team only to lose on a tiebreaker.  Along with Elizabeth Poulos, who competed in the Southeastern Regional Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl last fall, they have practiced all year for these competitions.  That meant two hours of practice a week, case preparation, and research.  They didn’t do that work alone.  Dr. Wilton Bunch and Dr. Mike Janas spent all semester coaching them through complex ethical cases.  These students are among our brightest Fellows, but that’s not what I’m most proud of.  They compete with dignity, grace, kindness, and sportsmanship.The world is better because of the dignity, grace, kindness, sportsmanship—and competence—of Samford students.

The world is better because of the dignity, grace, kindness, sportsmanship—and competence—of Samford students.

Monday Mission, March 30, 2015

Although Jake Hamilton graduated from Samford only a few months ago, he’s already discovering creative ways to help the students in his classroom at KIPP Indianapolis College Preparatory School, as shown in the attached news clip from the ABC affiliate in that city.

Although Jake Hamilton graduated from Samford only a few months ago, he’s already discovering creative ways to help the students in his classroom at KIPP Indianapolis College Preparatory School, as shown in the attached news clip from the ABC affiliate in that city.  Take a look to learn Jake’s secret to success for his students. 

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/local-news/teacher-turns-to-mp3-players-to-help-students-read?autoplay=true

The world is better because of Jake Hamilton.

Monday Mission, March 23, 2015

As I prepared to part company after dinner last week with one of our most distinguished graduates from the 1950s, he took my hand and said, “When we have the time I want to tell you about the impact of my Howard College—Samford—experience.”

As I prepared to part company after dinner last week with one of our most distinguished graduates from the 1950s, he took my hand and said, “When we have the time I want to tell you about the impact of my Howard College—Samford—experience.”  With only a little encouragement, he then related a few of the details of his rural background and how his time with faculty at Howard College laid the foundation for his career.  “It began with Howard College,” he said.  In reality, given this person’s considerable strengths, I think that the raw material was already in place when he arrived on the campus, but I join him in acknowledging the transformational power of higher education.

The world is better because we are engaged in meaningful, life-changing work.

 

 

 

Monday Mission, March 9, 2015

Jeanna and I joined with hundreds of friends of Dr. Gene Black on Saturday morning for a service at Dawson Memorial Baptist Church, in celebration of his life with us and his new life in a place far beyond our comprehension.

Jeanna and I joined with hundreds of friends of Dr. Gene Black on Saturday morning for a service at Dawson Memorial Baptist Church, in celebration of his life with us and his new life in a place far beyond our comprehension.  Dr. Black served as a member of Samford’s music faculty for 35 years, becoming Dean of the School of Music in 1980.  He retired in 2000.  The music for the service, offered by former members of our A Cappella Choir, was heavenly.  Dr. Black was a primary actor in shaping the legendary A Cappella Choir, but the influence of Dr. and Mrs. Black on the men and women who sang and spoke on Saturday morning transcends the development of a program, school, or university.  It was his soul, I think, that pointed thousands of young people to Christ.  Along the way, they found their competence, their calling, their profession, their voice.   

The world is better because of Gene Black.  We shall see him again.

Monday Mission, March 2, 2015

In a conversation over coffee last Friday morning, one of our distinguished alums, now retired, mused about his education at Samford.

In a conversation over coffee last Friday morning, one of our distinguished alums, now retired, mused about his education at Samford.  He was exuberant about Samford’s past, present, and future—but he reserved his highest praise for the core curriculum and general education.  Assailed throughout much of the marketplace today as irrelevant and burdensome, it was these courses which, throughout a successful career, still brought a gleam to the eyes of the man sitting across the table from me.  Like many of us who tended to take our general education courses for granted, he now understands that they were the elements which helped him to see across continents and lives to find understanding and hope. 

The world is better because of those who labor (and learn) in the vineyard of the core curriculum and general education.

Monday Mission, February 23, 2015

Over the weekend I read a message from the father of one of our student-athletes, offering words of appreciation for several Samford employees who have been of particular help in fostering his son’s academic and personal development.

Over the weekend I read a message from the father of one of our student-athletes, offering words of appreciation for several Samford employees who have been of particular help in fostering his son’s academic and personal development.  One line in the message stood out:  “Ms. Christina pulls no punches.”  He was speaking of Christina Harris, our Football Academic Coordinator.  What the father meant, I think, is that nurturing is not always a soft concept.  When we nurture our students, we sometimes tell them things that they don’t necessarily want to hear, but that we know are in their best interest.  Christina Harris demonstrates her commitment to the lives of her students by pulling no punches.  

The world is better because of Christina Harris.

 

 

Monday Mission, February 16, 2015

Step Sing weekend affords opportunities for many of us to reconnect with alumni and friends who visit the campus to attend one of the performances.

Step Sing weekend affords opportunities for many of us to reconnect with alumni and friends who visit the campus to attend one of the performances.  The alum with the longest journey to Homewood this year was probably Meredith Toering, a 2013 graduate currently working with Morning Star Foundation in Beijing, China.  The primary mission for Morning Star is to care for orphaned, abandoned, or needy children with heart disease.  Gifts raised by Step Sing participants enabled Meredith to return to Beijing with $10,863, enough to provide surgery for one of the children in her care.  For more information about Morning Star, visit http://morningstarproject.org.

The world is better because of Meredith Toering and the Samford students who helped to save a life.

 

Monday Mission, February 9, 2015

At a meeting a few days ago in Washington, DC, I heard David Coleman, President of the College Board, reflect on the value—and the demise in so much of higher education—of what he characterized as “productive solitude.”

At a meeting a few days ago in Washington, DC, I heard David Coleman, President of the College Board, reflect on the value—and the demise in so much of higher education—of what he characterized as “productive solitude.”  Writing this message at an early hour, looking across a serene campus, I’m heartened by the fact that Samford is a place where productive solitude may still be found, and even cherished.  Ideas and understanding come to many of us in quiet moments.  Even on the first day of the week of Step Sing, I’m in awe of the silent majesty of this place.

The world is better because productive solitude may still be found at Samford.

Monday Mission, February 2, 2015

The purpose of the American Journalism Historians Association (AJHA) is to "advance education and research in mass communications history

The purpose of the American Journalism Historians Association (AJHA) is to "advance education and research in mass communications history."  At last weekend's southeast symposium of the AJHA, Samford swept the top two awards in the category of undergraduate research, with Bailey Fuqua placing first and Rachel Stanback placing second. Following the presentation, Bailey and Rachel were quick to thank faculty member Julie Williams for her assistance in preparing them for the event.

The world is better because of Samford's emphasis on undergraduate scholarship.

Monday Mission, January 5, 2015

Last month we hosted Rev. Howard Golden and his family and friends on campus to celebrate his service through a program now known as the Ministry Training Institute.

 Last month we hosted Rev. Howard Golden and his family and friends on campus to celebrate his service through a program now known as the Ministry Training Institute.  When Rev. Golden began teaching courses in the program almost 60 years ago it was called the “Howard Extension Division,” which was created to expand the base of theological education throughout Alabama.  Rev. Golden’s efforts in recent years have focused on offering courses to inmates at prisons in the state, and his ministry has touched hundreds of lives at the Staton and Draper correctional facilities in Elmore County.     

The world is better because of Howard Golden.