Posted by William Nunnelley on 2009-02-24

A team from Samford University's Cumberland School of Law qualified for the National Trial Competition championship round in San Antonio, Texas, March 25-28 by winning the regional round last weekend in Tallahassee, Fla.

Winning team members were Megan Head, Carrollton, Ga.; Josh Hornady, Monroeville, Ala.; Lisha Li, Auburn, Ala.; and Ashley Reitz, Birmingham, Ala. Jim Roberts, a 1994 Cumberland graduate, coached the team.

A second Cumberland team, also coached by Roberts, advanced to the semifinal round of the Tallahassee event. Cumberland was the only school of 12 in the competition to have two teams advance to the semifinal round.

Other teams in the competition were from law schools at Barry University, Faulkner University, Florida Coastal, Florida State University, Mississippi College, Nova Southeastern, Stetson University, University of Alabama, University of Florida, University of Miami and the University of Mississippi.

Other Cumberland students participating were Andrew Brashier, Helena, Ala.; Bailey Gladden, Jasper, Ala.; Julie McMakin, Huntsville, Ala.; Robert Price, Pensacola, Fla.; and Megan Stephens, Aiken, S.C.

 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and U.S. News & World Report ranks Samford 66th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 104th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,683 students from 47 states and 19 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 6th nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.