Published on February 28, 2018 by Maryellen Newton  
Biologist Tyrone Hayes
Biologist Tyrone Hayes

Samford University’s Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences has created a new lecture named for longtime professors Mike Howell and Ellen McLaughlin.

The first lecture in the series–“From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men”–will be offered March 22 at 6 p.m. in Brooks Hall Auditorium. Speaker Tyrone Hayes of the University of California, Berkeley, is widely known for his research and advocacy related to the herbicide atrizine.

The Howell-McLaughlin lecture is one of four events the department is hosting in March and April, including:

 • “Employing Next Generation Sequencing to Understand Biodiversity: From Microbes to Macroevolutionary Patterns”–Tim Colston, Ph.D., George Washington University. March 8, 3:30 p.m., Christenberry Planetarium (Propst Hall 140).

“Romancing the Lily: The Natural History of Hymenocallis coronaria”–Larry Davenport, Ph.D., Samford University. April 5, 3 p.m., Christenberry Planetarium (Propst Hall 140).

 • David Butler, Cahaba Riverkeeper. April 19, 3 p.m., Christenberry Planetarium (Propst Hall 140).

Maryellen Newton is a journalism and mass communication major and a news and feature writer in the Division of Marketing and Communication.
 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 2nd nationally for student engagement and US News & World Report ranks Samford 86th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,729 students from 47 states and 30 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 1st nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.