Published on January 16, 2021 by Morgan Black  
birmingham king week

Samford University’s Office of Diversity and Intercultural Initiatives will partner with Birmingham community entities to present Birmingham King Week 2021. The initiative, which will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through a series of events, is a collaboration between the City of Birmingham Mayor’s Office, Hands On Birmingham, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, local colleges and universities, and surrounding community agencies.

Due to COVID-19, most events throughout the week will be held through virtual platforms. Events include a MLK Day 5K Drum Run, a virtual Day of Service, discussions surrounding King’s work and his legacy, a trivia night, and more. 

Included in the lineup will be a special virtual conversation centered around King’s sermon “A Time to Break Silence,” led by Cameron Thomas ’14, M.Div. ’18, Samford’s director of diversity enrichment and relations. This conversation on Monday, Jan. 18 at 6 p.m., will feature Douglas Webster, Beeson Divinity School professor of divinity, and Joseph Scrivner, Stillman College dean of chapel. Join the event via the Office of Diversity and Intercultural Initiative’s Facebook page.

 
Samford is a leading Christian university offering undergraduate programs grounded in the liberal arts with an array of nationally recognized graduate and professional schools. Founded in 1841, Samford is the 87th-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Wall Street Journal ranks Samford 1st nationally for student engagement and US News & World Report ranks Samford 37th in the nation for best undergraduate teaching and 97th nationally for best value. Samford enrolls 5,758 students from 48 states and 22 countries in its 10 academic schools: arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, health professions, law, nursing, pharmacy and public health. Samford fields 17 athletic teams that compete in the tradition-rich Southern Conference, and ranks 1st nationally for its Graduation Success Rate among all NCAA Division I schools.