The mission of the center is to promote rational inquiry and to further understanding of key issues at the interface of science and religion through educational and research activities. The center is committed to the ideas that science and religion are not inherently incompatible, and that insight into key science and religion issues has a rich history. The center’s mission, however, is oriented around the belief there is much to learn and much work to be done in exploring new avenues of understanding and communicating current views to others. Outside its commitment to general Christian principles and an ongoing search for truth, the center does not exist to promote any particular scientific theory or point of view.

Objectives

  • Stimulate critical thinking and promote dialogue on key issues central to science and religion.
  • Create and support interdisciplinary research and publication.
  • Sponsor workshops, seminars, lectures, and other educational events both on and off-campus.
  • Establish a mechanism for strengthening Christian faith and scientific understanding.
  • Supervise an undergraduate major in science and religion and recruit high-caliber students.
  • Seek grants and other funding to support Center objectives.

Contact jareeves@samford.edu to be added to the Center for Science and Religion contact list

Latest News

Photo Paul Wiget
Wiget Advances Science, Faith in Groundbreaking Projects
Chemistry professor Paul Wiget is working both within the church and within his profession to advance the unified cause of science and faith.  
Photo Beeson Divinity School and Samford Campus
Samford to Host Science and Theology Conference
Beeson Divinity School, the Department of Biblical and Religious Studies and the Department of Christian Ministry will host the Spring Theology Conference of the Carl F. H. Henry Center for Theological Understanding January 13-15, 2022. 
Photo Josh Reeves
Reeves Book Examines Scientific Trust and the Future of the Church
Reeves offers a sympathetic account of the average Christian in the pew and explains the reasons why skepticism toward mainstream science is compelling to many conservative Christians, but he also proposes a uniquely Christian defense of taking scientific expertise seriously as part of a healthy intellectual life and process of discernment.